Vice President in Charge of Revolution

By Murray D. Lincoln; David Karp | Go to book overview

CHAPTER 7

I WAS, from birth, a conservative Republican. I grew up and worked in an atmosphere where to be anything else was almost immoral. One day I vowed I would never vote Republican again as long as I lived. I remember that day very well.

During the Hoover administration I was appointed to a committee that sought to have the President introduce legislation to keep farmers from being foreclosed on their farms. Farmers, as I've mentioned, were in the midst of the depression long before the stock market crash of '29. A committee under the auspices of the American Farm Bureau went down to the White House. We were ushered into the Cabinet Room. Because I was the junior committee member, I moved to the rear of the room, allowing my more distinguished colleagues the places near the front. To my alarm and surprise, President Hoover entered and sat down beside me. I almost jumped from my seat from surprise and stage fright. Hoover was told why we had come to see him, although he had been briefed beforehand, and he then made a short speech, the substance of which was that he believed that the Federal Farm Board and the various measures the government had already taken were enough. The speech upset us, and me in particular. At the end Hoover presented Congressman Franklin Fort of New Jersey to discuss the matter further with us. Fort was introduced as a friend of agriculture, a farmer himself who understood and sympathized with farmers and their problems. Under our questions it developed that there was only one farm in Fort's congres-

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Vice President in Charge of Revolution
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page ii
  • Part One 1
  • Chapter 2 18
  • Chapter 3 39
  • Chapter 4 46
  • Part Two 59
  • Chapter 6 81
  • Chapter 7 97
  • Chapter 8 113
  • Part Three 131
  • Chapter 10 148
  • Chapter 11 160
  • Chapter 12 176
  • Part Four 193
  • Chapter 14 204
  • Chapter - 15 217
  • Chapter 16 232
  • Chapter 17 249
  • Part Five 275
  • Chapter 20 304
  • Part Six 316
  • Index 334
  • Acknowledgment 341
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