Vice President in Charge of Revolution

By Murray D. Lincoln; David Karp | Go to book overview

CHAPTER 17

A FEW YEARS after I'd gotten excited over the Ford-Ferguson tractor and the possibility of getting the world fed through mechanized agriculture, I discovered I'd been on the wrong track. That discovery came about in a curious fashion.

Dr. Raymond Miller, who was a ranch owner in California and had done public relations work for the Safeway Stores, was a friend of mine. Ray held a position as lecturer on the faculty of Harvard University's Graduate School of Business Administration, and in 1949 he had made two trips to Asia as observer and consultant to the Director General of the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations.

In the fall of 1950 Ray came to Columbus to talk to some national convention about the conditions he had found in Asia, where most of the people go to bed hungry every night. Hearing him talk, it occurred to me that what was needed was to get people themselves--not merely their governments--working on the problem of hunger in the underdeveloped countries. After his lecture I asked Ray how he'd like to make another trip around the world, this time to look into the prospects of a people-to-people approach. He grew quite excited about the idea, as did I, and that led to a long discussion, during which I must have touched on every one of my pet subjects, from the built-in selfishness in our economic system to the need for more international cooperatives. The upshot was that Ray invited me to come talk about

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Vice President in Charge of Revolution
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page ii
  • Part One 1
  • Chapter 2 18
  • Chapter 3 39
  • Chapter 4 46
  • Part Two 59
  • Chapter 6 81
  • Chapter 7 97
  • Chapter 8 113
  • Part Three 131
  • Chapter 10 148
  • Chapter 11 160
  • Chapter 12 176
  • Part Four 193
  • Chapter 14 204
  • Chapter - 15 217
  • Chapter 16 232
  • Chapter 17 249
  • Part Five 275
  • Chapter 20 304
  • Part Six 316
  • Index 334
  • Acknowledgment 341
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