The Lecherous Professor: Sexual Harassment on Campus

By Billie Wright Dziech; Linda Weiner | Go to book overview

7: The Future of Academe
EBONY OR IVORY TOWER?

We, however, are not prisoners . . . We have no reason to mistrust our world, for it is not against us. Has it terrors, they are our terrors; has it abysses, those abysses belong to us . . . and if only we arrange our life according to that principle which counsels us that we must' always hold to the difficult, then that which now still seems to us the most alien will become what we most trust and find most faithful.

Rainer Maria Rilke,
Letter

No one in higher education means for sexual harassment of students to exist. And no one approves of it. There is consensus on campus that sexual harassment is bad behavior and should be stopped. And What more appropriate place for reform to begin than the academic community.

The notoriety of Alexander v. Yale University in 1977 startled campus communities across the country into realizing that they needed to deal with the sexual harassment issue. In the wake of the decision, some individuals achieved visibility by making strong statements on their own campuses. A statement by President Edward J. Bloustein of Rutgers, for instance, was widely circulated as an example of administrative leadership (see Appendix). In 1979, when the American Council on Education held a series of national seminars on sexual harassment policy, the institutions with models available

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The Lecherous Professor: Sexual Harassment on Campus
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Acknowledgments v
  • Contents vii
  • Introduction 1
  • 1 - Sexual Harassment on Campus 9
  • 2 - Inside the Ivy Walls 39
  • 3 - Contemporary College Women 59
  • 4 - Voices of Women 89
  • 5 - The Lecherous Professor 115
  • 6 - Women Faculty 147
  • 7 - The Future of Academe 163
  • Appendices 187
  • Notes 202
  • Selected Bibliography 210
  • Index 215
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