The United States, Cuba, and Castro: An Essay on the Dynamics of Revolution and the Dissolution of Empire

By William Appleman Williams | Go to book overview

10
The Revolution Embattled at Home and Castro's Second Calculated Risk

The period between the promulgation of the Agrarian Reform Law on May 17 and the sentencing of Major Huber Matos to 20 years imprisonment on charges of treason in December, 1959, was characterized by sustained opposition to the Revolution from various segments of Cuban society. The Agrarian Reform Law extended and increased the disaffection among upper- and middle-class Cubans that had become apparent by the end of February. Some Cubans of the lower-mid- dle and lower classes--urban and rural--supported this opposition in fluctuating numbers and with varying degrees of overt action. In addition, the continuing depression, and the confusion and mistakes incident to implementing the revolutionary program, prompted many people who continued to support Castro to criticize the government within the framework of their underlying sympathy. And finally, Castro's ultimate acceptance of formal support from the Cuban Communist Party increased all such opposition and criticism.

It is essential, however, to realize that the overt anti- Castro opposition began and continued as an attack on the Revolution per se. Men of that counter-revolutionary persuasion worried from the outset about Communist influence in the government as part of their basic antagonism to the radicalism of the Revolution. The Agrarian Reform Law intensified and crystallized such opposition, caused a shake-up in the cabinet, and initiated a series of events which led ultimately to the American planned, financed, and directed invasion of Cuba in 1961.

The dramatic overture to that grand finale was the defection, near the end of June, of Major Pedro Luis Diaz Lanz,

-121-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The United States, Cuba, and Castro: An Essay on the Dynamics of Revolution and the Dissolution of Empire
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 184

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.