Czechoslovakia: Anvil of the Cold War

By John O. Crane; Sylvia E. Crane | Go to book overview

unilateral British maneuvers to revise the agreements for their transportation to the French front for the sake of utilizing them for anti-Bolshevik intervention in Siberia and at the northern ports. In any case, trouble developed directly for the Czechoslovak Legions as clashes erupted with the Soviet forces.


NOTES
1.
Received from Consul Wardrop, Moscow, April 1, 1918, Foreign Office (henceforth FO) 371/v. 3323, p. 325.
2.
4-page report by Capt. Vladimír Hurban, April 9, 1918, p. 1, War Office (henceforth WO) 106/v. 683. Hurban, belonging to that force, had returned recently from Vladivostok to the United States. He was subsequently stationed in Washington to represent the Czechoslovak National Council. He was later appointed as minister, then ambassador, to the United States from Czechoslovakia.
3.
Francis Oswald Lindley, Jan. 15, 1918, FO 371/v. 3297, p. 153.
4.
David R. Francis: Russia From The American Embassy, April 1916-November 1918 ( New York: Scribner's, 1921), pp. 224-25.
6.
Report of Russian representative of the British United Shipping Co., Ltd. in Petrograd, Mar. 13-26, 1918, FO 371/v. 3331:

If there were any doubt about the onerous terms imposed by the Germans on the Soviets at Brest, these were comprehensively analyzed for the British Foreign Office by a long time resident Russian representative of the British United Shipping Co., Ltd. in Petrograd, who reported on it as follows:

" Russia loses" Poland, or rather the Russian Polish provinces, also Lithuania (Kovno, Grodno, and Vilna governments) Courland, Livonia, Esthonia, and the Ukraine--the governments of Bolhynia, Podlia, Jekaterinoslav, Kiev, Tchernigoff, Poltava, Cherson, Kharkoff and Bessarabia, the governments of Kharkoff, Minsk, and Vitebsk or part of them.

The loss of these regions represents the loss of:

4% of the whole territory of Russia,
26% of the total population of Russia,
27% of the total arable land,
37% of the average crop,
26% of the railway system,
33% of the total value of manufactured articles, say of production,
39% of the total Horse Power of the country, N.B. Machinery,
75% of the total coal production, and
73% of the total pig iron production.

Three separate Republics are being proposed:

1. People living on the south side of the Caucasus Mountains.
2. Another Republic in the districts occupied by the Cossacks.
3. Third Republic comprising the Governments of Ufa, Orenburg ... where a Tartar majority exists.

-26-

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Czechoslovakia: Anvil of the Cold War
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Foreword ix
  • Acknowledgments xiii
  • Introduction xvii
  • Notes xxvi
  • 1- The Independence Movement Commences 1
  • Notes 10
  • 2- Founding of the Legions: Entrapment in Anti- Bolshevik Intervention 11
  • Notes 26
  • 3- The Legions Anabasis To the Sea 30
  • Notes 46
  • 4- Masaryk in America 50
  • Notes 62
  • 5- Drawing the Frontiers 63
  • Notes 70
  • 6- Internal Stabilization 72
  • Notes 84
  • 7- The Beneš Succession: Storm Warnings (1935-38) 85
  • Notes 101
  • 8- The Sudeten Fires Flare (1938) 103
  • Notes 121
  • 9- Summer Turmoil (1938) 124
  • Notes 130
  • 10- The Runciman Mission (summer 1938) 131
  • Notes 148
  • 11- Munich (september 1938) 151
  • Notes 169
  • 12- Aftermath of Munich (1938-41) 172
  • Notes 185
  • 13- War on Two Fronts (1941) 187
  • Notes 202
  • 14- Wartime Conferences And Treaties 205
  • Notes 215
  • 15- The Slovak Uprising: The Government's Return Home 218
  • Notes 232
  • 16- The Government Reconstituted On Home Ground (1945) 235
  • Notes 245
  • 17- Nationalities Transfers And Allied Army Withdrawals (1945) 247
  • Notes 255
  • 18- Democratic Socialization (1945-46) 257
  • Notes 271
  • 19- Cold War Beginnings (1946) 273
  • Notes 287
  • 20- Storm Signals (1947) 290
  • Notes 306
  • 21- The Communist Coup (1947-48) 308
  • Notes 318
  • 22- The Death of Jan Masaryk (1948) 320
  • Notes 332
  • Abbreviations 333
  • Bibliography 335
  • Index 343
  • About the Authors 353
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