Czechoslovakia: Anvil of the Cold War

By John O. Crane; Sylvia E. Crane | Go to book overview

may perhaps have impelled the Air Ministry to "reconsider the position... [and provide for the] speedy return of the Czechoslovak Air Force."34

Air Marshal Janoušek, commander of the squadron, who was soon to be elevated to assistant chief of staff, and the pilots of the fighters were officially welcomed on August 13th in Prague by Gen. Bohumil Boček, chief of the General Staff, who read a short message from Prime Minister Fierlinger soon after the fighters landed. Ambassador Nichols, unable to attend personally, sent his chargé d'affaires, John Taylor, to the rainy airport ceremony in his place. Nichols later reported he had "no doubt that the return of the Czechoslovak Squadron from the United Kingdom had aroused very great interest and... turned the thoughts of the people towards Great Britain." Within the week of August 21st, President Beneš took the salute at the ceremonial march of the Czechoslovak Air Force through Prague.35

The startling political overturn in Great Britain on June 20th, which unseated Churchill's conservative government in a stunning victory of the Labour Party, came as a "great surprise in Prague as everywhere else... General gratification was expressed at the swing to the left, which was interpreted as the final defeat of the Munich Men, [although] there was genuine regret at the elimination of Mr. Churchill, who is regarded as a true friend of this country, [and who] will forever remain to the Czechs the great statesman." It was generally deemed "that there will be no change in Great Britain's foreign policy."36


NOTES
1.
Philip Nichols to Anthony Eden, April 20, 1945, FO 371/v. 47121-109007.
2.
John Taylor, British Chargé d'Affaires, Prague, to Ernest Bevin, September 6, 1945, FO 371/v. 47093-111988.
3.
Nichols to Foreign Office, April 9, 1945, confidential, FO 371/v. 47121- 109006.
4.
Ibid.
5.
Nichols to Eden, April 20, 1945, FO 371/v. 47121-109007.
6.
Agreement between Czechoslovak government and Slovak Council, March 27, 1945, FO 371/v. 47121.
7.
Government edict re nationalities, April 20, 1945, FO 371/v. 47154/110023.
8.
U.S. State Department memorandum of a conversation, London, Eduard Beneš and Edward R. Stettinius, Jr., Secretary of State, Subject: Czechoslovakia, April 25, 1945, National Archives 1218, reel 29.

-245-

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Czechoslovakia: Anvil of the Cold War
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Foreword ix
  • Acknowledgments xiii
  • Introduction xvii
  • Notes xxvi
  • 1- The Independence Movement Commences 1
  • Notes 10
  • 2- Founding of the Legions: Entrapment in Anti- Bolshevik Intervention 11
  • Notes 26
  • 3- The Legions Anabasis To the Sea 30
  • Notes 46
  • 4- Masaryk in America 50
  • Notes 62
  • 5- Drawing the Frontiers 63
  • Notes 70
  • 6- Internal Stabilization 72
  • Notes 84
  • 7- The Beneš Succession: Storm Warnings (1935-38) 85
  • Notes 101
  • 8- The Sudeten Fires Flare (1938) 103
  • Notes 121
  • 9- Summer Turmoil (1938) 124
  • Notes 130
  • 10- The Runciman Mission (summer 1938) 131
  • Notes 148
  • 11- Munich (september 1938) 151
  • Notes 169
  • 12- Aftermath of Munich (1938-41) 172
  • Notes 185
  • 13- War on Two Fronts (1941) 187
  • Notes 202
  • 14- Wartime Conferences And Treaties 205
  • Notes 215
  • 15- The Slovak Uprising: The Government's Return Home 218
  • Notes 232
  • 16- The Government Reconstituted On Home Ground (1945) 235
  • Notes 245
  • 17- Nationalities Transfers And Allied Army Withdrawals (1945) 247
  • Notes 255
  • 18- Democratic Socialization (1945-46) 257
  • Notes 271
  • 19- Cold War Beginnings (1946) 273
  • Notes 287
  • 20- Storm Signals (1947) 290
  • Notes 306
  • 21- The Communist Coup (1947-48) 308
  • Notes 318
  • 22- The Death of Jan Masaryk (1948) 320
  • Notes 332
  • Abbreviations 333
  • Bibliography 335
  • Index 343
  • About the Authors 353
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