The Life of the Mind: Selected Papers

By Jason W. Brown | Go to book overview
is disturbed such that the incorrect meaning representation becomes converted into sound. In neologistic jargon, cognitive differentiation at both the semantic and phonemic levels is disturbed. The result is that incorrect meaning representations are converted into incorrect representations of segmental sound structure. In phonemic jargon, where none of the sound sequences transmit linguistic meaning, the cognitive differentiation of a representation of meaning is incomplete and as a result, this representation cannot be translated into an appropriate sound representation.This model of jargon provides the theoretical framework for a program of research whose goal is three-fold:
1. to identify the fundamental properties of semantic and phonological processes, as well as their relation to syntactic processes, by reconstructing the normal course of a language act from jargon symptomology; and
2. to carefully define, both neuropsychologically and linguistically, patterns of recovery or improvement from jargonaphasia, in order to
3. design a program of language facilitation which is motivated by, and takes full advantage of, the potential offered by those natural lines of recovery.

The achievement of these goals promises an exciting challenge.


NOTES
1. More recently, the term glossolalia has been revived by Lecours, and colleagues to refer to forms of phonemically deviant language, including aphasic jargon, schizophrenic speech and tongues spoken by persons said to be in charismatic states. The use of a single term to refer to phenomena of such diverse origins is presumbly intended to capture a structural similarity among them.
2. Certain French authors refer to the phonemic paraphasias of conduction aphasics as phonemic jargon.
3. Note metathesis of final /s/ from nothing is (= nothing's) to happening.
4. The majority of speech errors in normals occur on nouns ( Browman 1978).
5. It is of interest that semantic jargon as well is characterized by rhyming and other phonological relationships among verbal paraphasis. Kreindler, Calavrezo, and Mihailescu ( 1971) describe a semantic jargonaphasic in whom "the criterion for selection of [verbal paraphasias and neologisms] was not the semantic one but exclusively the criterion of auditory similarity determined by the rhyme ( 1971: 221)."

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The Life of the Mind: Selected Papers
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page i
  • Contents iii
  • Preface v
  • Introduction: Microgenetic Theory 1
  • I - Language 27
  • 1 - Language Representation in the Brain 29
  • Notes 99
  • 3 - Thalamic Mechanisms in Language 100
  • 4 - Selections on Aphasia and Lateralization 121
  • II - Perception 171
  • 5 - Microstructure of Objects 173
  • 6 - Microstructure of Images 206
  • 7 - Essay on Perception 252
  • III - Action 275
  • 8 - Frontal Lobes and the Organization of Action 277
  • 9 - The Microstructure of Action 302
  • 10 - The Problem of Perseveration 322
  • IV - 2 333
  • 11 - Toward a Microgenetic Theory of Memory 335
  • 12 - Emergence and Time 357
  • References 372
  • Author Index 419
  • Subject Index 431
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