Bearing Witness: Contemporary Works by African American Women Artists

By Jontyle Theresa Robinson | Go to book overview

SELECTED BIBLIOGRAPHY

COMPILED BY BEVERLY GUY-SHEFTALL


EXHIBITION CATALOGUES

These exhibits focused on or included African Americans, African American women, and women artists or they were curated by African Americans, particularly women, and include essays by black art historians and critics, particularly women.

A Courtyard Apart: The Art of Elizabeth Catlett and Francisco Mora. Biloxi, MS: Mississippi Museum of Art, 1990.

The Afro-American Artist in the Age of Cultural Pluralism. Montclair, NJ: Montclair Art Museum, 1987.

Alexander, Margaret Walker. Elizabeth Catlett. Jackson, MS: Jackson State College, 1973.

Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority. Afro-American Women in Art. Their Achievements in Sculpture and Painting. Greensboro, NC: Negro Heritage Committee, 1969.

Amos, Emma. Hanging Loose at the Port Authority. New York: Port Authority Terminal, 1984.

_____. Resisting Categories/Finding Common Ground. Newark, NJ: City Without Walls, 1995.

Amos, Emma, et al. Progressions, A Cultural Legacy. New York: The Clock Tower, 1986.

_____ et al. You Must Remember This. Jersey City, NJ: Jersey City Museum, 1992.

Art and Ideology. New York: The New Museum of Contemporary Art, 1984.

Art As A Verb: The Evolving Continuum, Installations, Performances, and Videos by 13 African American Artists. Essays by Leslie King Hammond and Lowery Stokes Sims. Baltimore: Maryland Institute College of Art, 1988.

Art in Washington and Its Afro-American Presence, 1940-1970. Washington, DC: Washington Project for the Arts, 1985.

Autobiography: In Her Own Image. Essays by Howardina Pindell, Judith Wilson, and Moira Roth. New York: INTAR Latin American Gallery, 1988.

Benberry, Cuesta. Always There: The African American Presence in American Quilts. Louisville: The Kentucky Quilt Project, 1992.

Benjamin, Tritobia Hayes. The Life and Art of Lois Mailou Jones. San Francisco: Pomegranate Artbooks, 1994.

Bibby, Deidre L. Augusta Savage and the Art Schools of Harlem. New York: The Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture, 1988.

Black Art: Ancestral Legacy, The African Impulse in African- American Art. Dallas: Dallas Museum of Art, 1989.

Black Women in the Arts. Montclair, NJ: Montclair State College Gallery, 1990.

Blake, Nayland, Lawrence Rinder, and Amy Scholder, eds. In A Different Light: Visual Culture, Sexual Identity, Queer Practice. San Francisco: City Lights Books, 1995.

The Blues Aesthetic: Black Culture and Modernism. Washington, DC: Washington Project for the Arts, 1989.

Bontemps, Arna Alexander, and Jacqueline Fonvielle-Bontemps. Forever Free: Art by African American Women 1862-1980. Alexandria, VA: Stephenson, 1980.

Buchanan, Beverly. ShackWorks: A 16-year Survey. Montclair, NJ: The Montclair Art Museum, 1994.

California Black Artists. New York: The Studio Museum in Harlem, 1978.

Campbell, Mary Schmidt. Harlem Renaissance: Art of Black America. New York: The Studio Museum in Harlem and Harry N. Abrams, 1987.

Celebration: Eight Afro-American Artists Selected by Romare Bearden. New York: Henry Street Settlement, 1984.

Change: Over 100 Pounds Weight-loss Performance. New York: Bernice Steinbaum Gallery, 1987.

Coast To Coast: A Women of Color National Artist's Book Project. New York: Jamaica Art Center, 1988.

Constructed Images: New Photography. New York: The Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture, 1989.

Contemporary Afro-American Photography. Oberlin, OH: Allen Memorial Art Museum, Oberlin College, 1983.

-165-

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Bearing Witness: Contemporary Works by African American Women Artists
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page 3
  • Dedication 5
  • Acknowledgments 5
  • Contents 7
  • Preface 9
  • Foreword 11
  • The Visual Education of Spelman Women 12
  • Notes 13
  • Passages - A Curatorial Viewpoint 15
  • Notes 36
  • Warrior Women: Art as Resistance 39
  • Notes 47
  • Triumphant Determination: the Legacy of African American Women Artists 49
  • Notes 78
  • African American Women Artists - Into the Twenty-First Century 83
  • Notes 93
  • Hagar's Daughters: Social History, Cultural Heritage, and Afro-U.S. Women's Art 95
  • Notes 108
  • Illustrations and Biographies 113
  • Afterword 161
  • Chronology 162
  • Selected Bibliography 165
  • List of Illustrations 172
  • Index 174
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