The Sublime Figure of History: Aesthetics and Politics in Twentieth-Century China

By Ban Wang | Go to book overview

Introduction

I want to explore various aesthetic means by which the political image of the individual has been envisioned and forged in twentiethcentury China. What, for example, has it meant to be an individual, to possess a personal and collective identity, in the turbulent history of twentieth-century China? What do the shapes of self look like within various ideological discourses and aesthetic forms such as literature and film? What are the symbolic and mental resources that have fueled individual and collective aspirations and been used to heal the wounds and despairs of modern Chinese history? What is an individual supposed to be, in addition to his or her creaturely inclinations for food and sex? With what figure should one identify in order to be larger, stronger, and loftier than one's mundane self, to pull oneself out of the mire of the everyday and the instinctual, and to generate meaning out of the bewildering nonsense of history? Modern Chinese literature and culture have busily put one figure after another on the pedestal for us to admire and emulate. From May Fourth to June Fourth, Chinese.Culture has never ceased to search for a sublime, lofty Hero. If the grand narrative of modern Chinese history is a tragic drama, the spectator has been induced to endow the dominant actor with sublime qualities.

This study is not meant to be an essay on the sublime. It is not a study of the sublime as a mere aesthetic category within the academic "discipline of aesthetics" aimed at describing a concept with hairsplitting finesse. Rather, I want to examine a mythically conceived

-1-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Sublime Figure of History: Aesthetics and Politics in Twentieth-Century China
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Acknowledgments vii
  • Contents *
  • Introduction 1
  • 1 - Sublimation Unto Death: the Aesthetic Search for Meaning in Cultural Crisis 17
  • 2 - Writing China: the Imaginary Body and Allegorical Wilderness 55
  • The Sublime and Gender 101
  • 4 - Desire and Pleasure in Revolutionary Cinema 123
  • 5 - The Sublime Subject of Practice 155
  • 6 - The Cultural Revolution: a Terrible Beauty is Born 194
  • Conclusion 263
  • Reference Matter 269
  • Notes 271
  • Character List 287
  • Bibliography 293
  • Index 305
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 312

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.