The Literature of Roguery - Vol. 2

By Frank Wadleigh Chandler | Go to book overview

CHAPTER XII
ROGUERY IN RECENT FICTION

1. The New Romanticism

IN the contemporary reaction against the despotism of fact the literature of roguery has largely participated. Picaresque fiction, although normally associated with realism, has always tended to supplement earlier studies of low-life by stories told for the story's sake. Two types of rogue in particular have found favor with the romanticists, -- the sea rover, and the road-knight or outlaw.

From the qualified rascality of Scott Pirate to the humorous scoundrelism of Cuteliffe-Hyne Adventures of Captain Kettle, or the rattling bravery of his Prince Rupert, the Buccaneer, the range of nautical picaros is a wide one; but most are romantic and incline to villainy rather than to roguery. Here belong such gentry as figure in Bloundelle-Burton Hispaniola Plate and Gentleman-Adventurer, in Alan Oscar Captain Kid's Millions, in Stevenson Treasure Island, The Wrecker, and The Ebb Tide, in S. R. Crockett Little Anna Mark, and in older favorites like Angus Bethune Reach's Leonard Lyndsay, E. B. G. Warburton Darien, or the Merchant Prince, G. W. Thornbury Buccaneers, or Monarchs of the Main, and W. H. G. Kingston John Deane. A famous Welsh pirate of the seventeenth century is celebrated in Edward Howard Sir Henry Morgan, in Owen Rhoscomyl's Jewel of Ynis Galon, and in Cyrus Townsend

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