A History of Canada: Dominion of the North

By Donald Creighton | Go to book overview

CHAPTER ONE
THE FOUNDING OF NEW FRANCE

I

IT WAS the Norsemen who first discovered the giant stepping-stones which link northern Europe with northern Northern North America. In the ninth and tenth centuries, these dynamic Scandinavian peoples were driven outward from their their homeland by repeated explosive bursts of energy; and their savage raids and restless migrations carried them to places so scattered and remote as Russia, northern France, Sicily, and the British Isles. Somewhere about the middle of the ninth century they colonized Iceland; they found and occupied Greenland a little over a hundred years later; and it was apparently in the year 1000, on a long, troubled voyage from Norway to Greenland, that Leif Eriksson was blown far out of his course by storms and found for the first time the unknown countries of the west. After that first amazing discovery, the Norsemen from Greenland must have made many voyages to the strange lands which the Saga of Eric the Red called Markland and Vinland, and which could only have lain in North America. Almost certainly the Greenland Vikings must have ventured south along the Atlantic coastline at least as far as the Gulf of St. Lawrence. They may even have found that other great northern gateway to the continent, Hudson Bay; but though it is conceivable that a body of Norsemen may have struck out on an

-1-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
A History of Canada: Dominion of the North
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 626

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.