Issues of National Security in the 1970's: Essays Presented to Colonel George A. Lincoln on His Sixtieth Birthday

By George Lincoln; Amos A. Jordan | Go to book overview

4.Security of the North Atlantic Alliance*

GENERAL ROBERT J. WOOD (RET.)

Since World War II, the United States has unstintingly joined in the development and defense of the North Atlantic area. It has maintained substantial military forces in Europe, fostered the area's economic recovery and growth, rebuilt damaged or destroyed military power, promoted political stability under conditions of free democracy, and helped both friend and defeated enemy. Through these efforts, the United States has provided a bulwark against the military power that supported the crusade of international Communism. In short, it has worn the mantle of Western leadership, uncomfortable though the fit has been to many.

Now, in the late- 1960's, though heavily engaged in other parts of the world, the United States continues to find that it cannot neglect its leadership responsibilities in the North Atlantic area--even if collective action in support of common interests is questioned in some quarters.

What does the future hold for the nations of the North

____________________
*
The views expressed in this essay are the author's own and do not necessarily represent those of the United States Government.
The term is used to include all the members of the North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO), even those nations distant from the Atlantic Ocean, such as Italy, Greece, and Turkey, as well as Spain, even though it is not a member of NATO.

-75-

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