Nineteen Thirty-One Political Crisis

By R. Bassett | Go to book overview

CHAPTER XVII
CONCLUSION

'Any man in my position at the time, knowing all that I did, would have acted as I acted. However, I wish sometimes that someone else had been in my position at the time.' So MacDonald said to Nicolson when discussing the 1931 crisis with him many years afterwards.1 So he implied in several statements made during the crisis itself, as, for example, in his opening election speech at Easington on October 12:

I know a lot of you shook your heads over that National Government. If I might whisper in your ears -- I may have shaken my own. Do you think that was the sort of thing we wanted? Not at all.

Unhappily, plaintively, many of his devoted friends and admirers in the Labour Party held, or tried to convince themselves, that he need not have acted as he did.

It must be granted that the situation confronting MacDonald in August 1931, was one of extraordinary complexity. He was at the head of a minority Government which had been restricted essentially, though not exclusively, to the task of 'keeping things going'. That task had been from the start highly uncongenial to considerable elements in his Party: it became more and more so. It was rendered far more difficult than it otherwise would have been by the immediate onset of the great world depression and afterwards by the effects of its rapid intensification. When the financial crisis came, the Labour Cabinet was in no position to deal with it on other than orthodox lines. It accepted the need to undertake the task, but failed to agree on the methods of accomplishing it.

Much criticism has been directed at the financial orthodoxy of the period, and at the banking policies which had been pursued. Whether justified or not, that criticism was of no assistance to the Government in coping with the immediate crisis: a point which MacDonald repeatedly made. No authority himself on such mat-

____________________
1
Op. cit., p. 494 (footnote).

-338-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Nineteen Thirty-One Political Crisis
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 464

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.