International Law and Diplomacy in the Spanish Civil Strife

By Norman J. Padelford; Bureau of International Research of Harvard University and Radcliffe College. | Go to book overview

CHAPTER I
THE LEGAL STATUS OF THE CONTESTING PARTIES

THE OUTBREAK OF THE INSURRECTION

FORETOLD by months of cumulative unrest and violence, the standard of armed rebellion was raised in Spain on July 14, 1936, when a detachment of the army seized the government radio station at Valencia and broadcast the announcement that all military garrisons were in control of the Fascists. Government-censored news dispatches admitted the existence of widespread "insurrection" throughout Spain and its possessions on July 18 By the 22d of the same month the rebels controlled half of the national territory and had established a Junta Defensa Nacional "assuming the powers of the Spanish State." The Madrid Government decreed all rebellious officers and troops guilty of high treason, announced a determination to "wage decisive warfare on the rebels," distributed arms to the populace and created a "Red Militia."1

The most immediate questions of law which arise in any insurrection or civil war are: first, what is the legal status of the rebellious group within the state; second, what is the legal status of each of the contesting parties in the society of states; third, what rights do each of the parties have in dealing with the other, and with foreign states?

Distinction is often made between revolt, insurrection, rebellion, revolution, and civil war, although all are forms and degrees of opposition to and an endeavor to bring about an alteration of the institutions or politics of an established government.2 By the municipal law of all countries, the taking up of arms against the state or its duly established government is a supreme crime, treason. Usually the

____________________
1
New York Times, July 23, 1936.
2

The various forms may be differentiated thus:

An insurrection or revolt is usually confined to a small portion of a country, is of relatively short duration, and supported by a minimum of organization. It is distinguishable from organized crime and is opposed by the troops of the state instead of by the police.

A rebellion or revolution usually embraces a larger part of a country, is supported by authorities assuming the functions and powers of a government and by organized and

-1-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
International Law and Diplomacy in the Spanish Civil Strife
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Preface vii
  • Contents xi
  • Chapter I - The Legal Status of the Contesting Parties 1
  • Conclusions 23
  • Chapter II - Interference with Foreign Shipping 25
  • Conclusions 50
  • Chapter III - The International Non-Intervention System 53
  • Chapter IV - The League of Nations and the Civil Strife 121
  • Conclusions 140
  • Chapter V - Problems in Diplomatic and Consular Relations 144
  • Conclusions 167
  • Chapter VI - The United States and the Civil Strife 169
  • Summary of American Policy 187
  • Chapter VII - The Termination of the Strife 189
  • Chapter VIII - Conclusion 196
  • Appendices 203
  • Index 675
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 712

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

    Already a member? Log in now.