International Law and Diplomacy in the Spanish Civil Strife

By Norman J. Padelford; Bureau of International Research of Harvard University and Radcliffe College. | Go to book overview

CHAPTER III
THE INTERNATIONAL NON-INTERVENTION SYSTEM

One of the most striking features of the present Spanish civil strife has been the evolution, and devolution, of the international accord for non-intervention in Spain, and the observation and patrol system set up in connection therewith.1 The purpose motivating the accord was the desire to prevent Europe from becoming so bound up with and so divided over the ideological aspects of the conflict that the fighting would lead to a general European war. If the devices have not succeeded altogether in stopping the entrance of supplies and men into Spain; if they have glossed over or provided a screen behind which violations of pledged undertakings have occurred; if they have become popular laughing-stock, and have allowed unfortunate Spain to become a military laboratory for the testing of weapons and strategy, they have, nevertheless, been instrumental, along with other things perhaps, in averting an extension of hostilities to other territories.

From the outbreak of the insurrection, men and materials of war of foreign nationality and origin poured into Spain for the benefit of both sides. No accurate estimate of the amount of supplies or of the numbers of foreign soldiers and service hands has been made. Fantastic charges and reports were constantly circulated, and the Italian Foreign Office even went so far as to announce at one time that there were forty thousand Italian troops in Spain.2 No attempt will be

____________________
1
Part of this chapter appeared originally in the American Journal of International Law, October, 1937, pp. 578-603.
2
London Times, Oct. 19, 1937. See very full dispatch to same paper from a special correspondent in Spain, March 9, 1937. Informative dispatches will be found in the New York Times under the dates of May 27, June 22, July 12, 21, 1938; Feb. 17, 1939. It seems reasonably clear that Italian armed intervention first occurred several days after airplanes and implements of war began reaching the Spanish Government from Powers favorable to its cause. There has recently appeared a volume entitled Foreign Intervention in Spain by " Hispanicus" ( London, 1938). The temper of the editor's comments and the partial and fragmentary nature of the so-called "documents" composing the volume are such as to render it of little scientific value. A large number of the "documents" are brief excerpts from newspaper articles written by correspondents in Loyalist territory, whose dispatches have been subject to censorship, or by writers notorious for their political leanings. There is little material regarding intervention on the Loyalist side, and such as there is, is of a general rather than of a specific nature.

-53-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
International Law and Diplomacy in the Spanish Civil Strife
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Preface vii
  • Contents xi
  • Chapter I - The Legal Status of the Contesting Parties 1
  • Conclusions 23
  • Chapter II - Interference with Foreign Shipping 25
  • Conclusions 50
  • Chapter III - The International Non-Intervention System 53
  • Chapter IV - The League of Nations and the Civil Strife 121
  • Conclusions 140
  • Chapter V - Problems in Diplomatic and Consular Relations 144
  • Conclusions 167
  • Chapter VI - The United States and the Civil Strife 169
  • Summary of American Policy 187
  • Chapter VII - The Termination of the Strife 189
  • Chapter VIII - Conclusion 196
  • Appendices 203
  • Index 675
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 712

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.