The Western Frontiers of Imperial Rome

By Steven K. Drummond; Lynn H. Nelson | Go to book overview

The test of their vitality often came when the local garrisons were posted elsewhere and the frontier moved on. Many of these settlements failed, or their residents simply followed the troops. Many others succeeded, however, and developed an economic life independent of purely military markets. Some of the great cities of the Rhine-Danube region--Cologne, Coblenz, Mainz, Vienna, Belgrade, Budapest-- arose in just such a fashion.

There are few great monuments of Roman civil culture to be found in the region of the old frontier, and urban life there was primitive by Roman standards. 42 One must remember, however, that many of the cities of the interior were artificial creations. They were centers of trade and commerce because the government had decreed that they be so, and they disposed of wealth amassed from slave labor, war booty, and the generally favorable economic conditions created by the government's unequal taxation of the eastern provinces of the empire. The frontier towns enjoyed none of these advantages, but arose purely in response to the economic needs and opportunities of the frontier. 43 They were functioning economic communities of artisans and merchants, and differences in wealth and social standing among their residents were comparatively small and lightly regarded. In this sense, at least, the frontier towns were distinguished by their relative freedom and equality.


Notes
1.
It might be better to say that they were ambivalent. Public life was concentrated in cities, and neither labor nor expense was spared in embellishing those cities and providing them with amenities. The Romans seemed to take great pleasure in the crowds, markets, and hustle and bustle of their cities. At the same time, however, these same Romans, particularly the upper classes, longed for the quiet and repose of their country estates. Those whose station in life and resources permitted it alternated their time between city and country, fully content with neither.
2.
The Roman city-state was generally about the same area as an American county, and served many of the same functions. There was a great variety in size, wealth, and population among them, however. Some were relatively small towns, and some had populations of several thousands. In cases where a district did not possess a single concentration of population, the Roman government often allowed the villages of a district to confederate and assume the status of a city-state. Such an administrative area was called a saltus. Although the city-states differed widely in size and appearance, their local institutions were set by law and were virtually identical throughout the empire.

-147-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Western Frontiers of Imperial Rome
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • List of Maps vii
  • Preface ix
  • I- The Edge of Empire 3
  • II- The Frontier Takes Shape 13
  • Notes 35
  • III- Feeding the Army- The Agrarian Settlement 42
  • Notes 70
  • IV- Pastoral Pursuits- Ranching and Grazing on the Frontier 77
  • Notes 96
  • V- Trading on and beyond the Frontier 101
  • Notes 122
  • VI- The Towns and Cities of the Frontier 127
  • Notes 147
  • VII- The Growth of Industry 152
  • Notes 169
  • VIII- The "Romanization" of the Frontier 172
  • Notes 191
  • IX- The Gods and Goddesses of the Frontier 196
  • Notes 212
  • X- Final Thoughts 216
  • Notes 224
  • Chronology of the Roman Frontier 225
  • Glossary 235
  • Selected Bibliography 249
  • Index 267
  • About the Authors 277
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 278

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.