Writings of John Quincy Adams - Vol. 4

By John Quincy Adams; Worthington Chauncey Ford | Go to book overview

against the weight of a strong and growing opposition, was unable to support itself after his decease. They endeavored to recruit their force by taking in Wellesley and Canning as subalterns under them, but were refused. The House of Commons passed a vote to address the Regent and ask him to form a new administration, with a friendly hint how it was to be formed. Wellesley, and Moira, and Canning, and the opposition, and the wrecks of the Perceval ministry, were alternately manœuvering, mining, countermining, and protracting, resigning and resuming, and publishing in the newspapers, as if they were throwing dice or turning cards for the executive authority. This state of interregnum or anarchy continued to the date of our last accounts, 5 June. I had flattered myself when the survivors of the Perceval administration resigned, that their successors would immediately remove the great stumbling block, the Orders in Council, and that we should be saved thereby from the impending war. But the formation of the new ministry lingers so long that I now forbode little or nothing good from the issue of the struggle. The Perceval policy appears likely to maintain its ascendency yet a little longer, long enough I fear to produce that catastrophe from which we have so long endeavored to preserve ourselves, but in which it seems the will of Heaven that we should be involved.

At the same time while this drama draws towards a tragical conclusion, another still more terrible in its aspect is opening in the north of Europe. Russia there stands arrayed against the united forces of France, Germany and Italy. The parties have been two years assembling against each other the whole power it was possible for them to put in motion, and last week the hostilities commenced by an invasion of the Russian territories in Poland. The French,

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Writings of John Quincy Adams - Vol. 4
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • To the Secretary of State 1
  • To the Secretary of State 12
  • To the Secretary of State 17
  • To Joseph Pitcairn 20
  • To Abigail Adamso 22
  • To the Secretary of State 27
  • To the Secretary of State 34
  • To Thomas Boylston Adams 39
  • To the Secretary of State 43
  • To the Secretary of State 59
  • To Thomas Boylston Adams 63
  • To the Secretary of State 72
  • To the Secretary of State 81
  • To the Secretary of State 89
  • To John Adams 93
  • To the Secretary of State 98
  • To the Secretary of State 102
  • To George William Erving 111
  • To John Adams 117
  • To Abigail Adams 122
  • To William Jones 129
  • To the Secretary of State 153
  • To Thomas Boylston Adams 160
  • To George William Erving 170
  • To the Secretary of State 177
  • To John Adams 181
  • To William Eustis 187
  • To George William Erving 192
  • To the Secretary of State 195
  • To John Adams 204
  • To George Washington Adams 210
  • To John Adams 218
  • To Abigail Adams 224
  • To the Secretary of State 226
  • To John Adams 236
  • To the Secretary of State 245
  • To the Secretary of State 249
  • To the Secretary of State 275
  • To the Secretary of State 277
  • To the Secretary of State 287
  • To the Secretary of State 292
  • To Abigail Adams 302
  • To Alexander Hill Everett 310
  • To the Secretary of State 314
  • To William Plumer 323
  • To William Gray 330
  • To the Secretary of State 334
  • To Abigail Adams 340
  • To the Crew of the "Monticello" at Cronstadt 343
  • To Levett Harris 344
  • To John Adams 352
  • To the Secretary of State 355
  • To John Adams 358
  • To Abigail Adams 362
  • To John Adams 366
  • To Thomas Boylston Adams 373
  • To Benjamin Waterhouse 379
  • To the Secretary of State 382
  • To Abigail Adams 388
  • To the Secretary of State 392
  • To John Adams 393
  • To the Secretary of State 396
  • To the Comte De Romanzoff 401
  • To Robert Fulton 402
  • To Thomas Boylston Adams 405
  • To Robert Fulton 406
  • To Abigail Adams 411
  • To the Secretary of State 418
  • To John Adams 419
  • To Thomas Boylston Adams 427
  • To the Secretary of State 437
  • To Abigail Adams 445
  • To John Adams 450
  • To Abigail Adams 460
  • James Monroe to John Adams 468
  • To John Adams 468
  • To John Speyer 474
  • James Monroe to John Quincy Adams 475
  • To R. G. Beasley 476
  • To Abigail Adams 478
  • To Abigail Adams 483
  • To John Speyer 487
  • To the Secretary of State 490
  • To the Secretary of State 492
  • To the Secretary of State 498
  • To Benjamin Waterhouse 502
  • To the Comte De Romanzoff 508
  • To the Secretary of State 510
  • To the Secretary of State 512
  • To R. G. Beasley 518
  • To Abigail Adams 520
  • To Benjamin Waterhouse 525
  • To Abigail Adams 528
  • To Abigail Adams 532
  • To the Secretary of State 533
  • To Robert Fulton 540
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