State Names, Seals, Flags, and Symbols: A Historical Guide

By Benjamin F. Shearer; Barbara S. Shearer et al. | Go to book overview

5 State and Territory Capitols

The history of American state and territory capitols is replete with political intrigue, architectural blunderings, frequent destruction by fire, and occasional destruction by war. This history is also, however, a record of the deep and abiding patriotism of the citizens of each state and territory and their respect for and pride in the functions of their governments.

Many of today's capitols were constructed at the end of the nineteenth or beginning of the twentieth century. The architecture of these buildings is clearly informed by the style of the United States Capitol--neoclassical, domed capitols that call to mind ancient democracies. Some states, however, chose contemporary architecture to express their belief in progress. Notable among all the capitols in this regard are the "skyscraper" style capitols of Nebraska and Louisiana, built in the second and third decades of this century. The capitols of Hawaii and New Mexico, completed in the 1960s, are contemporary designs that express the individual history and heritage of those states. But whatever their design, state and territory capitols stand as monuments to the people, to their hard work, and to their belief in the progress of democracy.


ALABAMA

Montgomery was chosen as the capital city of Alabama during the 1845- 1846 legislative session. Since becoming a state in 1817, the legislature had

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State Names, Seals, Flags, and Symbols: A Historical Guide
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Copyright Acknowledgments v
  • Contents vii
  • Introduction ix
  • 1 - State and Territory Names and Nicknames 1
  • Notes 19
  • 2 - State and Territory Mottoes 23
  • Notes 35
  • 3 - State and Territory Seals 39
  • Notes 71
  • 4 - State and Territory Flags 73
  • 5 - State and Territory Capitols 103
  • Notes 125
  • 6 - State and Territory Flowers 129
  • Notes 141
  • 7 - State and Territory Trees 145
  • Notes 164
  • 8 - State and Territory Birds 167
  • Notes 194
  • 9 - State and Territory Songs 197
  • Notes 207
  • 10 - State and Territory Legal Holidays and Observances 209
  • Notes 264
  • 11 - State and Territory License Plates 269
  • Notes 290
  • 12 - State and Territory Postage Stamps 295
  • 13 - Miscellaneous Official State and Territory Designations 309
  • Notes 327
  • 14 - State and Territory Fairs and Festivals 331
  • Notes 385
  • Selected Bibliography of State and Territory Histories 389
  • Index 413
  • About the Authors 438
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