Neural Darwinism: The Theory of Neuronal Group Selection

By Gerald M. Edelman | Go to book overview

LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS
1.1. A mnemon or single memory unit as proposed by J. Z. Young (1965).15
2.1. Figure.27
2.2. Context.28
2.3. The Wundt-Hering illusion.29
2.4. Leaf patterns from Cerella's experiments (Cerella 1977).30
2.5. Polymorphous rule for set membership, after Dennis et al. (1973).31
2.6. Anatomical variability. (Pearson and Goodman 1979; Macagno et al. 1973; Ramón y Cajal 1904).35
3.1. Dependency of two forms of recognition function on the number N of elements in a repertoire, calculated according to a simple model.48
3.2. Two extreme cases of repertoires having unique (nondegenerate) and completely degenerate elements.49
3.3. Comparison of theoretical and experimental recognition functions in Darwin I.53
3.4. A classification couple operating through reentry in real time.62
4.1. Cartoons of primary processes.75
4.2. Diagram of the linear chain structure of two primary CAMs (NCAM and L-CAM) and of the secondary Ng-CAM.77
4.3. CAM binding mode and cell surface modulation.79
4.4. Major CAM expression sequence.83
4.5. Change in the distribution of N-CAM and L-CAM during formation of the neural plate (neural induction) and groove (neurulation).85
4.6. N-CAM at the motor end plate and changes in prevalence in muscle after denervation.90
4.7. Causal roles of CAMs in modifying embryonic induction and border formation.91
4.8. Composite CAM fate map in the chick.95
4.9. The regulator hypothesis as exemplified in a CAM regulatory cycle and in epigenetic sequences.98

-xiii-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Neural Darwinism: The Theory of Neuronal Group Selection
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 371

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.