Christianity in Jewish Terms

By Tikva Frymer-Kensky; David Novak et al. | Go to book overview

sianism, Torah, and commandments, they help pave the road on which the Messiah must travel. How so? Among the tasks of the Messiah will be "to prepare the world to worship God with one accord." This will be accomplished through natural means: "Let no one think that in the days of the Messiah any of the laws of nature will be set aside, or any innovation be introduced into creation. The world will follow its normal course." 8 But to convert the world to pure monotheism overnight (to say nothing of acceptance of the Torah and its commandments) would be an "innovation into creation," a miracle of unprecedented proportions, extending over the face of the entire world and persisting forever. Maimonides believes that the role of Christianity and Islam is to wean idolaters away from idolatry. It is their job to prepare the larger world to accept faith in God and in his Torah in order "to call upon the name of the Lord to serve Him with one consent" ( Zeph. 3:9) when the true Messiah comes.


Conclusion

R. Simlai and Maimonides, for all their differences, illustrate that a Jewish view of redemption must emphasize a number of issues: this- worldliness, good works, and truth. Paul's view of redemption as expressed in Romans seems to be wholly other-worldly, divorced from good works, and focused entirely on truth. Paul seems to be answering the following question: What doctrine must a person accept as true in order to be saved? Maimonides is the first Jew to ask even a similar question (but for Aristotelian, not Pauline, reasons); still, he is drawn by the Jewish tradition to focus on good works in this world as well.

How are we to understand Paul's position, which seems so divergent from the faith of his fathers and mothers? The answer relates to the question of original sin. Since for Paul "all have sinned and fall short of the glory of God," they can now only be "justified by his grace as a gift" (3:21-23). Grace cannot be earned; it can only be bestowed by God as a gift and accepted as such by those who are happy enough to recognize it and receive it. On this question the Jewish view seems well expressed by the Mishnah (Sanh. 10:1): "All Israelites have a share in the world to come"--since humans by their nature do not fall short of the glory of God, they are by nature worthy of a share in the world to come. 9 Thus, by nature, humans are redeemed. The Jew's problem is not his or her individual salvation, but how to bring redemption to the world.

-274-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Christianity in Jewish Terms
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 444

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.