The Domestic Politics of German Unification

By Christopher Anderson; Karl Kaltenthaler et al. | Go to book overview

Acknowledgments

We gratefully acknowledge the German Academic Exchange Service (DAAD) for providing very generous financial support for the completion of this book. Working with such backing made our lives as editors a lot easier. We would also like to thank the Political Science Department at Washington University in St. Louis, which provided us with a home while we worked on this project. We appreciate in particular the support of the department's chairs, John Sprague and Robert Salisbury, as well as the clerical help provided by Janet Rensing -- faxing was more fun when done with Janet's help.

Chris Anderson acknowledges the support of John Sprague and Karl Kaltenthaler, and of Russell Dalton of the University of California, Irvine, who graciously supplied helpful hints on publishing an edited volume on German politics. Thanks also to Kylie Jill Hansen, a special friend in the English Department at Washington University, for straightening out questions of prose and everyday life.

Karl Kaltenthaler acknowledges the support provided by a Fulbright Research Grant to the German Democratic Republic in 1989-1990, which facilitated his research on East German politics, and also furnished a unique opportunity to witness history in the making. Gerd Horsch, Günther Streibel, and Manfred Melzer were particularly helpful in explaining the politics of East Germany. Last, but by no means least, Karl Kaltenthaler thanks his wife, Florence Kot, for encouragement and support.

Wolfgang Luthardt thanks the German Academic Exchange Service (DAAD), in particular Wedigo de Vivanco and Heidrun Suhr in New York and Marianne Reichling and Gottfried Gögold in Bonn. Moreover, he thanks the director of the European Studies Program at Washington University, Paul Michael Lützeler; the Department of Political Science, especially Robert Salisbury, John Sprague, John Kautsky, Arnold Heidenheimer, and Victor LeVine; his coeditors; and Wilhelm Neuefeind of the Departrnent of Economics. These institutions and colleagues made

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