Women's History and Ancient History

By Sarah B. Pomeroy | Go to book overview
6.
See William H. Race, The Classical Priamel from Homer to Boethius, Mnemosyne, suppl. 74 ( Leiden: E. J. Brill, 1982).
7.
See, for example, Garry Wills, "The Sapphic 'Umvertung aller Werte,'" American Journal of Philology 88 ( 1967): 434-42. Cf. Denys Page, Sappho and Alcaeus ( Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1959), 53: "The sequence of thought might have been clearer." In Winkler's view, "There is a charming parody of logical argumentation in these stanzas" ( "Gardens of Nymphs,"74).
8.
On Sappho's emphasis on the active choices made by Helen see Page duBois, "Sappho and Helen", Arethusa 11 ( 1978): 89-99. Cf. Leah Rissman, Love as War: Homeric Allusion in the Poetry of Sappho ( Königstein: Hain, 1983), 42-43.
9.
On chlōros see Eleanor Irwin, Colour Terms in Greek Poetry ( Toronto: Hakkert, 1974),31-78.
10.
Ulrich von Wilamowitz-Moellendorff, Sappho und Simonides ( Berlin: Weidmann, 1913), 58-59.
11.
Max Treu, Sappho ( Munich: Ernst Heimeran, 1954), 178-79; Hermann Fränkel , Early Greek Poetry and Philosophy, trans. Moses Hadas and James Willis ( New York: Harcourt Brace Jovanovich, 1973), 176; Thomas McEvilley, "Sappho, Fragment Thirty-One: The Face behind the Mask", Phoenix 32 ( 1978): 1-18.
12.
George Devereux, "The Nature of Sappho's Seizure in Fr. 31 LP as Evidence of Her Inversion", Classical Quarterly 20 ( 1970): 17-34. For opposing views see M. Marcovich , "Sappho: Fr. 31: Anxiety Attack or Love Declaration?" Classical Quarterly 22 ( 1972): 19-32, and G. L. Koniaris, "On Sappho, Fr. 31 (L.-P)", Philologus 112 ( 1968): 173-86, See also Mary R. Lefkowitz, "Critical Stereotypes and the Poetry of Sappho", Greek, Roman and Byzantine Studies 14 ( 1973): 113-23.
13.
Page, Sappho and Alcaeus, 80.
14.
Anne Pippin Burnett, "Desire and Memory (Sappho Frag. 94)", Classical Philology 74 ( 1979): 16-27. On the importance of memory and of mutuality see also Eva Stehle Stigers, "Sappho's Private World", Women's Studies 8 ( 1981): 54-56, reprinted in Reflections of Women in Antiquity, ed. H. P. Foley ( New York: Gordon & Breach, 1981), 45-61.
15.
Wilamowitz-Moellendorff, Sappho und Simonides, 51.

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