Women's History and Ancient History

By Sarah B. Pomeroy | Go to book overview

traces of the real person have survived. She became a moral exemplum of the worst possible behavior for a Roman matron, just as the portrait of Octavia was deliberately groomed to project the feminine ideals formulated by Roman men. 82


Notes

The genesis of this paper dates back to 1983, when I had the honor of participating as a guest in a National Endowment for the Humanities institute on women in classical antiquity directed by Sarah B. Pomeroy, assisted by Helene P. Foley and Natalie Boymel Kampen. Their enthusiasm and the opportunity for total immersion in this new and challenging field stimulated me to have another look at Fulvia. I am also indebted to Meyer Reinhold, Phyllis Culham, and the referees for reading and commenting on earlier drafts of this manuscript.

Unless otherwise specified, abbreviations follow those used in L'année philologique and the second edition of the Oxford Classical Dictionary.

1.
J. P. V. D. Balsdon, Roman Women: Their History and Habits ( New York, 1965), 55.
2.
B. Förtsch, Die politische Rolle der Frau in der römischen Republik (Stuttgart, 1935), 108; Sarah B. Pomeroy, Goddesses, Whores, Wives, and Slaves: Women in Classical Antiquity ( New York, 1975), 185, 189; J. Hallett, "Perusinae Glandes and the Changing Image of Augustus", AJAH 2 ( 1977): 151-71, passim; G. Clark, "Roman Women", G&R 28 ( 1981): 209; S. Dixon, "A Family Business: Women's Role in Patronage and Politics at Rome, 80-44 B.C.", Class. et Med. 34 ( 1983): 109; E. G. Huzar , "Mark Antony: Marriages vs. Careers", CJ 81 ( 1986): 102.
3.
"The Early Career of Fulvia", AJP 86 ( 1965): 1-32.
4.
Note the sober warning of M. Finley: "It would be a bad mistake to read our own emotions and values into the picture." See The Silent Women of Rome, in Aspects of Antiquity: Discoveries and Controversies, 2d ed. ( New York, 1977), 132, echoed by M. R. Lefkowitz, "Wives and Husbands", G&R 30 ( 1983): 31.
5.
Cicero Phil. 3.16; cf. Val. Max. 7.8.1. On this see Babcock, "Fulvia", 4-5, followed by Pomeroy, Goddesses, Whores, Wives, and Slaves, 285. The passage in Valerius Maximus is problematic: "Quam certae, quam etiam notae insaniae Tuditanus, utpote qui populo nummos sparserit togamque velut tragicam vestem in foro trahens maximo cum hominum risu conspectus fuerit ac multa his consentanea fecerit. Testamento filium instituit heredem, quod Ti. Longus, sanguine ei proximus, hastae iudicio subvertere frustra conatus est." Babcock would emend filium, which occurs in the two principal ninth-century manuscripts of Valerius Maximus, to read Fulviam. Instead the reading filiam, preserved in the epitome of Julius Paris that appears in the margin of one of these manuscripts, is much to be

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