Women's History and Ancient History

By Sarah B. Pomeroy | Go to book overview

CONTRIBUTORS

MARY TALIAFERRO BOATWRIGHT, associate professor of classical studies at Duke University, teaches courses in Roman history, archaeology, Latin, and women's studies. She covers the same range and uses a similarly interdisciplinary approach in her articles and book, Hadrian and the City of Rome ( 1987). Her current projects include a study of elite women of the Roman Empire and a book on Roman provincial cities.

ELIZABETH CARNEY, an associate professor of history at Clemson University, has written on Macedonian political history, on Virgil, and on the role of women in ancient monarchy. She is currently at work on a monograph dealing with royal Macedonian women.

SHAYE J. D. COHEN is Shenkman Professor of History at the Jewish Theological Seminary in New York. He is the author of From the Maccabees to the Mishnah ( 1987) and other studies of Judaism in antiquity. After completing his current research on the history of conversion to Judaism, he hopes to write a history of the Jewish laws and customs regarding menstruation.

MIREILLE CORBIER is director of research at the Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique in Paris and a former member of the Ecole Française de Rome. Her publications include L'aerarium Saturni et l'aerarium militare: administration et prosopographie sénatoriale ( Paris, 1975), Indulgentia Principis (forthcoming), and articles on the family, literacy, food, public finance, and the economy of the Roman Empire.

LESLEY DEAN-JONES is assistant professor of classics at the University of Texas at Austin, where she teaches courses in Greek and Latin and on aspects of Greek literature, society, and medicine. She has published articles on Greek history and medicine and is currently completing a monograph, Women's Bodies in Classical Greek Science.

DIANA DELIA is assistant professor of history at Texas A&M University, where she teaches ancient history. She is the author of Alexandrian Citizenship during the Roman Principate and several articles on Hellenistic and

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