Businessman in the Statehouse: Six Years as Governor of North Carolina

By Luther H. Hodges | Go to book overview

Foreword

THIS book was begun with some reluctance on my part, but now that it is finished I am glad to have written it.

A year or more before I left the office of governor of North Carolina, I received a request from Mr. Lambert Davis of the University Press at Chapel Hill to write a book on developments in the state during my six years as governor. Mr. Davis was extremely helpful in the planning and development of the book.

I owe thanks to many people for their assistance and advice. Chief among these is Charles Dunn of the Durham Morning Herald, who has helped tremendously in the research and in the preparation of the final manuscript. He gave invaluable aid in the preparation of the chapter on North Carolina's reaction to the United States Supreme Court's May, 1954, decision affecting public school segregation, a subject on which he had written a master's thesis.

Miss Harriet Herring, a long-time friend and associate from Chapel Hill, was of great help, particularly in her insistence on the anecdotes and other human interest touches that help to give life to the book. Ed L. Rankin, Jr., my private secretary during most of my term as governor, assisted greatly in checking my accounts of the experiences we shared and in improving the felicity of my phrases throughout.

Two other former associates in the governor's office, Paul Johnston and Robert Giles, gave advice and assistance, especially on the subjects of budget making and the Henderson strike.

-vii-

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