Science and Religion in the Era of William James

By Paul Jerome Croce | Go to book overview

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS

One unimpeachable certainty remains upon completing this book: I am very much in the debt of many friends, colleagues, and family members for their insights, help, and support.

Although this work has evolved into a wholly new species since I wrote my dissertation, I still lean on the excellent education I received at Georgetown and Brown Universities. My intellectual preparation as an undergraduate and my professional training as a graduate student complemented each other as did the institutions' contrasting cultural traditions. I would particularly like to thank Emmett Curran for his patience and sterling example during my first steps in intellectual and cultural history. Joan Richards introduced me to the "Darwin industry" and continues to be an excellent guide to the history of science and professional life in general. John E. Smith, of Yale's philosophy department, welcomed a graduate student from a neighboring school and a different discipline, giving generously of his time and vast stores of knowledge in teaching me about James's own works. The late William G. McLoughlin was a paragon of integrity and energy, and his model of moral commitment and rigorous scholarship continues to inspire. Most important, John L. Thomas, who could be tough, kind, and enthusiastic all at once, pushed me with his youthful exuberance always to think about the broadest cultural trends and to write with storytelling drama.

I am also pleased to thank the many people who have helped this project by reading my work or offering critical suggestions: Catherine Albanese, Andrea Birch, Priscilla Brewer, Andrew Carlson, Vincent Colapietro, Deborah Coon, P. Todd Davis, William Dean, Steve Gillon, Kenneth Everett, Mark Franklin, Mary Gluck, John Hague, David Hollinger, Davis Jerome, James Kloppenberg, Jack Lane, Paul Lauritzen, Phillip Lucas, Michael McFarland, Jay Mechling, Don Musser, Robert Perkins, Lewis Perry, Theodore Porter, Dorothy Ross, Marc Rothenberg, Charlene Haddock Seigfried, Jeff Simpson, Zeno Swijtink, Eugene Taylor, Sumner Twiss, Jane Williams-Hogan, Bill Woodward, and Leila Zenderland. In addition, Paul Boyer, George Cotkin, and Jon Roberts have read all of the manuscript in earlier drafts--often more than once--and I can only hope that this final fallible draft makes use of their criticism and lives up to their standards.

I thank all of my students for listening (usually!) to the things I find so very important, for giving me daily reminders of the relation between scholarship and popularization, and for constantly challenging me with their questions

-xv-

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