Science and Religion in the Era of William James

By Paul Jerome Croce | Go to book overview

NOTES

Complete bibliographic information on the works cited below will be found in the bibliography. When I used a primary source that could also be found in a more accessible source, I have cited both, putting the primary source first and the more accessible source in square brackets []. All notes include author, title, and pages, with some exceptions: frequently cited sources are indicated with an abbreviation from the list below; and numbers following the entries on the Collected Papers of Charles Sanders Peirce (CPCP) refer to volume and to paragraph number.


Abbreviations
CPCP Peirce Charles Sanders. Collected Papers of Charles Sanders Peirce. 8 vols.
Edited by Charles Hartshorne et al. Cambridge: Harvard University Press,
1931-58.
LCW Wright Chauncey. The Letters of Chauncey Wright. Edited by James Bradley Thayer . Cambridge: Press of J. Wilson and Son, 1878.
LR James Henry. The Literary Remains of the Late Henry James. Edited by
William James. Boston: James R. Osgood, 1884.
LWJ James William. The Letters of William James. Edited by Henry James. Bos-
ton: Atlantic Monthly Press, 1920.
PD Wright Chauncey. Philosophical Discussions. Edited by Charles Eliot Norton . New York: Henry Holt, 1877.
TCWJ Perry Ralph Barton. The Thought and Character of William James. 2 vols.
Boston: Little, Brown and CO., 1935.
WCP Peirce Charles Sanders. Writings of Charles Sanders Peirce: A Chronological
Edition
. 5 vols. to date. Edited by Max H. Fisch et al. Bloomington: Indiana University Press, 1982-92.

Preface
1.
Most scholarship on William James has emphasized his psychology, philosophy, and religious thought. More specifically, he has been credited with providing a profound influence on the following disciplines: On the practice of psychology, see Browning, Pluralism and Personality; and Donnelly, ed., Legacy of William James. On non-Freudian psychotherapeutics, see Taylor, William James on Exceptional Mental States. On philosophical psychology, see Seigfried, Chaos and Context; and Myers, William James. On philosophical realism, see Ford, William James's Philosophy; and Roth, British Empiricism and American Pragmatism. On process philosophy, see Eisendrath, Unifying Moments; and Fontinell, Self, God, and Immortality. On phenomenology, see Wilshire, William James's Phenomenology; and Edie, William James and Phenomenology. On existentialism, see John K. Roth, Freedom and Morality;

-233-

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