Dramatist in America: Letters of Maxwell Anderson, 1912-1958

By Maxwell Anderson; Laurence G. Avery | Go to book overview

63. TO MRS. F. DURAND TAYLOR 1

New City
April 5, 1938

Dear Mrs. Taylor:

The Marlowe legend has tempted me more than once but most definitely when Hotson's book came out. Lately I have thought of him as the symbol of modern loneliness and loss of faith, but always the fact that he was a writer and that I have a prejudice against writing about writers, turns me aside from any real consideration of the story. It may be that there is new material or a new light on the old material that would allow me to see a play in Marlowe's life, and since you so generously offer the fruits of your own thinking and the matter has somewhat haunted you, I should like very much to know in some detail what kind of story and meaning you have founded on Dr. Hotson's researches. No doubt, as you suggest, the concept would refuse to grow if transplanted, but something in what you say may turn out to be just the catalytic agent I have needed.

Your letter went a long way about in reaching me and came only yesterday. I thought of calling you at once for a letter like that is rare to any of us. I conquered that impulse, being a little shy myself about breaking down barriers, and contented myself with looking up the three articles which you mentioned. 2 I gather that you are interested in Marlowe's possible use of the theatre as a springboard into importance and higher politics and I am not at all sure that I like that approach to the subject, but I should like to know what meaning these ghosts have had for you. Lest another letter should go wandering, my address is New City, Rockland County, New York.

Sincerely

P.S. I am keeping your book for a couple of days to study your underscorings.

1.
Marjorie F. Taylor of East Orange, New Jersey, had written to Anderson about her idea for a play based on the life of Christopher Marlowe ( March 15, 1938; T). Her three-page letter, sent to him in care of the Author's League of America, outlined characters and situations, and with the letter she sent a copy of J. Leslie Hotson, The Death of Christopher Marlowe ( 1925), saying that it contained the core of her idea for the play and that she had been haunted by the idea since her student days at Hollins College in the twenties. Her hope was that Anderson would be attracted to the idea and

-71-

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Dramatist in America: Letters of Maxwell Anderson, 1912-1958
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Acknowledgments ix
  • Introduction xiii
  • Maxwell Anderson: A Chronology xxix
  • Code to Location of Letters lxxii
  • List of Letters lxxiv
  • Part I Becoming a Playwright 1912-1925 1
  • I. to John M. Gillette1 3
  • 2. to Henry Cowell1 4
  • 3.To Mrs. Marguerite Wilkinson1 4
  • 3.To Mrs. Marguerite Wilkinson1 4
  • 3.To Mrs. Marguerite Wilkinson1 5
  • 3.To Mrs. Marguerite Wilkinson1 5
  • 3.To Mrs. Marguerite Wilkinson1 6
  • 3.To Mrs. Marguerite Wilkinson1 6
  • 7. to Upton Sinclair 9
  • 7. to Upton Sinclair 9
  • 7. to Upton Sinclair 9
  • 8. to the Editor, Dial 12
  • 9. to Upton Sinclair 13
  • 10. to Upton Sinclair 13
  • 10. to Upton Sinclair 14
  • 10. to Upton Sinclair 14
  • 10. to Upton Sinclair 15
  • 12. to Van Wyck Brooks1 16
  • 13. to Harold Monro1 16
  • 13. to Harold Monro1 17
  • 13. to Harold Monro1 17
  • 13. to Harold Monro1 18
  • 13. to Harold Monro1 18
  • 13. to Harold Monro1 18
  • 16. to William Stanley Braithwaite1 19
  • 17. to Heywood Broun1 19
  • 17. to Heywood Broun1 20
  • 17. to Heywood Broun1 20
  • 17. to Heywood Broun1 21
  • 17. to Heywood Broun1 21
  • 17. to Heywood Broun1 22
  • 17. to Heywood Broun1 22
  • 17. to Heywood Broun1 22
  • 17. to Heywood Broun1 23
  • 17. to Heywood Broun1 23
  • 17. to Heywood Broun1 23
  • 17. to Heywood Broun1 24
  • 17. to Heywood Broun1 24
  • 17. to Heywood Broun1 25
  • 17. to Heywood Broun1 25
  • 17. to Heywood Broun1 25
  • Part II Achievement and Recognition 1926-1940 27
  • 25. to Arthur Hobson Quinn1 29
  • 26. to Barrett H. Clark 30
  • 26. to Barrett H. Clark 31
  • 26. to Barrett H. Clark 31
  • 26. to Barrett H. Clark 32
  • 26. to Barrett H. Clark 32
  • 26. to Barrett H. Clark 32
  • 26. to Barrett H. Clark 32
  • 26. to Barrett H. Clark 33
  • 26. to Barrett H. Clark 33
  • 26. to Barrett H. Clark 34
  • 31. to Barrett H. Clark 35
  • 32. to Theresa Helburn 35
  • 32. to Theresa Helburn 36
  • 32. to Theresa Helburn 36
  • 32. to Theresa Helburn 36
  • 34. to Gertrude Anthony (anderson) 37
  • 35. to Barrett H. Clark 38
  • 36. to Lela Chambers 38
  • 36. to Lela Chambers 39
  • 36. to Lela Chambers 39
  • 36. to Lela Chambers 40
  • 36. to Lela Chambers 41
  • 36. to Lela Chambers 41
  • 39. to George Middleton1 42
  • 40. to George Middleton 42
  • 40. to George Middleton 42
  • 41. to Walter Prichard Eaton1 43
  • 42. to George Middleton 43
  • 42. to George Middleton 44
  • 42. to George Middleton 44
  • 42. to George Middleton 44
  • 44. to Walter Prichard Eaton 45
  • 45. to Walter Prichard Eaton 45
  • 45. to Walter Prichard Eaton 46
  • 45. to Walter Prichard Eaton 46
  • 45. to Walter Prichard Eaton 47
  • 45. to Walter Prichard Eaton 47
  • 45. to Walter Prichard Eaton 47
  • 48. to Mrs. Harriet Keehn1 48
  • 49. to Lawrence Langner1 48
  • 49. to Lawrence Langner1 49
  • 49. to Lawrence Langner1 53
  • 51. to S. N. Behrman. 54
  • 52. to Margery Bailey 54
  • 52. to Margery Bailey 55
  • 53. to Margery Bailey 56
  • 53. to Margery Bailey 56
  • 54. to Margery Bailey 57
  • 54. to Margery Bailey 58
  • 54. to Margery Bailey 59
  • 54. to Margery Bailey 60
  • 54. to Margery Bailey 60
  • 54. to Margery Bailey 62
  • 54. to Margery Bailey 62
  • 54. to Margery Bailey 63
  • 58. to Ray Lyman Wilbur1 64
  • 59. to John F. Wharton 66
  • 59. to John F. Wharton 67
  • 59. to John F. Wharton 67
  • 59. to John F. Wharton 68
  • 59. to John F. Wharton 68
  • 59. to John F. Wharton 69
  • 62. to Robert E. Sherwood 70
  • 63. to Mrs. F. Durand Taylor1 71
  • 64. to John F. Wharton 72
  • 64. to John F. Wharton 72
  • 65. to John F. Wharton 73
  • 66. to Elmer Rice 74
  • 67. to Mrs. F. Durand Taylor 76
  • 68. to Gilmor Brown1 77
  • 69. to Mrs. Florence B. Hult1 78
  • 70. to Helen Deutsch1 79
  • 71. to Laurence Moore1 80
  • 71. to Laurence Moore1 80
  • 71. to Laurence Moore1 81
  • 71. to Laurence Moore1 81
  • 71. to Laurence Moore1 81
  • 71. to Laurence Moore1 82
  • 74. to Paul Muni 83
  • 75. to Marston Balch1 83
  • 75. to Marston Balch1 84
  • 75. to Marston Balch1 84
  • 75. to Marston Balch1 86
  • 75. to Marston Balch1 86
  • 75. to Marston Balch1 86
  • 78. to Victor Samrock1 87
  • 79. to Sidney Howard 87
  • 79. to Sidney Howard 89
  • 79. to Sidney Howard 89
  • 79. to Sidney Howard 90
  • 79. to Sidney Howard 91
  • 79. to Sidney Howard 92
  • 79. to Sidney Howard 92
  • 79. to Sidney Howard 93
  • 79. to Sidney Howard 93
  • 79. to Sidney Howard 94
  • 86. to Polly Howard 95
  • 86. to Polly Howard 95
  • 86. to Polly Howard 96
  • 86. to Polly Howard 96
  • 86. to Polly Howard 97
  • 86. to Polly Howard 97
  • 86. to Polly Howard 98
  • 86. to Polly Howard 98
  • 86. to Polly Howard 99
  • 86. to Polly Howard 99
  • 86. to Polly Howard 100
  • 86. to Polly Howard 100
  • 86. to Polly Howard 101
  • 86. to Polly Howard 101
  • 86. to Polly Howard 102
  • 86. to Polly Howard 102
  • 86. to Polly Howard 105
  • 94. to S. N. Behrman 106
  • Part III: Achievement and Controversy 1941-1953 107
  • 95. to Helen Hayes1 109
  • 96. to Donald Ogden Stewart1 110
  • 97. to George Middleton 110
  • 97. to George Middleton 111
  • 97. to George Middleton 111
  • 97. to George Middleton 112
  • 97. to George Middleton 112
  • 97. to George Middleton 112
  • 100. to the Playwrights' Company 113
  • 101. to Louis Finkelstein1 114
  • 101. to Louis Finkelstein1 114
  • 101. to Louis Finkelstein1 115
  • 101. to Louis Finkelstein1 115
  • 101. to Louis Finkelstein1 116
  • 101. to Louis Finkelstein1 116
  • 104. to Brooks Atkinson 117
  • 105. to Lela Chambers 118
  • 106. to Avery Chambers1 119
  • 107. to Edwin P. Parker, Jr.1 120
  • 108. to Russel Crouse and Clifton Fadiman1 120
  • 109. to Lela and Dan Chambers 122
  • 110. to Lee Norvelle1 122
  • 110. to Lee Norvelle1 124
  • 113. to Lela and Dan Chambers 127
  • 114. to Edwin P. Parker Jr. 127
  • 114. to Edwin P. Parker Jr. 128
  • 114. to Edwin P. Parker Jr. 128
  • 114. to Edwin P. Parker Jr. 129
  • 114. to Edwin P. Parker Jr. 129
  • 114. to Edwin P. Parker Jr. 130
  • 114. to Edwin P. Parker Jr. 131
  • 114. to Edwin P. Parker Jr. 139
  • 114. to Edwin P. Parker Jr. 140
  • 114. to Edwin P. Parker Jr. 143
  • 114. to Edwin P. Parker Jr. 144
  • 114. to Edwin P. Parker Jr. 145
  • 120. to Gertrude Anderson 152
  • 121. to Gertrude Anderson 156
  • 122. to Hesper Anderson 157
  • 123. to Gertrude Anderson 158
  • 123. to Gertrude Anderson 165
  • 123. to Gertrude Anderson 166
  • 123. to Gertrude Anderson 177
  • 123. to Gertrude Anderson 179
  • 123. to Gertrude Anderson 180
  • 123. to Gertrude Anderson 180
  • 123. to Gertrude Anderson 181
  • 123. to Gertrude Anderson 181
  • 123. to Gertrude Anderson 182
  • 123. to Gertrude Anderson 182
  • 123. to Gertrude Anderson 184
  • 123. to Gertrude Anderson 184
  • 123. to Gertrude Anderson 185
  • 123. to Gertrude Anderson 185
  • 123. to Gertrude Anderson 186
  • 123. to Gertrude Anderson 186
  • 123. to Gertrude Anderson 186
  • 123. to Gertrude Anderson 187
  • 123. to Gertrude Anderson 187
  • 133. to Lela and Dan Chambers 188
  • 134. to Dwight D. Eisenhower 189
  • 134. to Dwight D. Eisenhower 190
  • 134. to Dwight D. Eisenhower 190
  • 134. to Dwight D. Eisenhower 192
  • 137. to Joseph Wood Krutch1 193
  • 136. to the Playwrights' Company 194
  • 134. to Dwight D. Eisenhower 194
  • 134. to Dwight D. Eisenhower 195
  • 134. to Dwight D. Eisenhower 195
  • 134. to Dwight D. Eisenhower 196
  • 134. to Dwight D. Eisenhower 196
  • 134. to Dwight D. Eisenhower 197
  • 134. to Dwight D. Eisenhower 197
  • 134. to Dwight D. Eisenhower 198
  • 134. to Dwight D. Eisenhower 198
  • 134. to Dwight D. Eisenhower 199
  • 134. to Dwight D. Eisenhower 199
  • 134. to Dwight D. Eisenhower 201
  • 134. to Dwight D. Eisenhower 202
  • 134. to Dwight D. Eisenhower 202
  • 134. to Dwight D. Eisenhower 202
  • 134. to Dwight D. Eisenhower 203
  • 134. to Dwight D. Eisenhower 204
  • 134. to Dwight D. Eisenhower 204
  • 134. to Dwight D. Eisenhower 205
  • 134. to Dwight D. Eisenhower 205
  • 134. to Dwight D. Eisenhower 206
  • 134. to Dwight D. Eisenhower 206
  • 134. to Dwight D. Eisenhower 206
  • 149. to Arthur S. Lyons 207
  • 150. to S. N. Behrman 208
  • 150. to S. N. Behrman 208
  • 151. to the New York Newspaper and Magazine Theater Critics1 209
  • 152. to E. B. White1 213
  • 152. to E. B. White1 214
  • 153. to E. B. White 215
  • 154. to Archer Milton Huntington 215
  • 154. to Archer Milton Huntington 216
  • 154. to Archer Milton Huntington 216
  • 154. to Archer Milton Huntington 217
  • 154. to Archer Milton Huntington 217
  • 154. to Archer Milton Huntington 218
  • 154. to Archer Milton Huntington 218
  • 154. to Archer Milton Huntington 220
  • 154. to Archer Milton Huntington 221
  • 154. to Archer Milton Huntington 222
  • 159. to the Editor, Atlantic Monthly1 224
  • 160. to the Newspaper Drama Critics of New York1 225
  • 161. to Brooks Atkinson 227
  • 161. to Brooks Atkinson 228
  • 161. to Brooks Atkinson 229
  • 161. to Brooks Atkinson 229
  • 161. to Brooks Atkinson 230
  • 161. to Brooks Atkinson 230
  • 161. to Brooks Atkinson 231
  • 161. to Brooks Atkinson 231
  • 161. to Brooks Atkinson 232
  • 161. to Brooks Atkinson 232
  • 161. to Brooks Atkinson 238
  • 167. to Samuel J. Silverman1 240
  • 168. to John Arthur Chapman1 241
  • 169. to Archer Milton Huntington 241
  • 169. to Archer Milton Huntington 242
  • 169. to Archer Milton Huntington 242
  • 169. to Archer Milton Huntington 243
  • 169. to Archer Milton Huntington 243
  • 169. to Archer Milton Huntington 243
  • 172. to Brooks Atkinson 244
  • 173. to John F. Wharton 245
  • 174. to the Playwrights' Company 245
  • 174. to the Playwrights' Company 246
  • 174. to the Playwrights' Company 246
  • 174. to the Playwrights' Company 247
  • 174. to the Playwrights' Company 248
  • 174. to the Playwrights' Company 248
  • 174. to the Playwrights' Company 249
  • 174. to the Playwrights' Company 249
  • 174. to the Playwrights' Company 250
  • 174. to the Playwrights' Company 251
  • 174. to the Playwrights' Company 251
  • 174. to the Playwrights' Company 252
  • 174. to the Playwrights' Company 252
  • 174. to the Playwrights' Company 252
  • 181. to Stephen Sondheim1 253
  • 182. to John F. Wharton 253
  • 182. to John F. Wharton 254
  • 182. to John F. Wharton 254
  • 182. to John F. Wharton 256
  • 182. to John F. Wharton 257
  • 182. to John F. Wharton 259
  • 185. to Elmer Rice 260
  • 186. to Archer Milton Huntington 260
  • 186. to Archer Milton Huntington 261
  • 186. to Archer Milton Huntington 261
  • 186. to Archer Milton Huntington 262
  • 188. to Lela Chambers 263
  • Part IV Achievement and Peace - 1954-1958 265
  • 189. to Robert E. Sherwood 267
  • 190. to John F. Wharton 268
  • 191.To Lela Chambers 268
  • 191.To Lela Chambers 268
  • 191.To Lela Chambers 269
  • 192. to Lotte Lenya Weill1 270
  • 193. to Victor Samrock 271
  • 193. to Victor Samrock 272
  • 194. to Victor Samrock 273
  • 195. to John F. Wharton 274
  • 196. to Elmer Rice 274
  • 196. to Elmer Rice 275
  • 196. to Elmer Rice 275
  • 196. to Elmer Rice 276
  • 196. to Elmer Rice 276
  • 196. to Elmer Rice 276
  • 199. to Lela Chambers 277
  • 200. to the Playwrights' Company 278
  • 200. to the Playwrights' Company 279
  • 200. to the Playwrights' Company 279
  • 200. to the Playwrights' Company 279
  • 200. to the Playwrights' Company 280
  • 200. to the Playwrights' Company 281
  • 200. to the Playwrights' Company 281
  • 200. to the Playwrights' Company 281
  • 204. to Enid Bagnold 282
  • 205. to Elmer Rice 283
  • 206. to Victor Samrock 283
  • 206. to Victor Samrock 284
  • 206. to Victor Samrock 284
  • 206. to Victor Samrock 285
  • 206. to Victor Samrock 285
  • 206. to Victor Samrock 285
  • 206. to Victor Samrock 286
  • 206. to Victor Samrock 286
  • 210. to Mabel Driscoll Bailey1 287
  • 211. to Paul Green 287
  • 211. to Paul Green 288
  • 211. to Paul Green 288
  • 211. to Paul Green 290
  • Appendix I 293
  • Appendix II 319
  • Appendix III 322
  • Appendix IV 330
  • Index 345
  • The Author 367
  • The Book 367
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