A Good Southerner: The Life of Henry A. Wise of Virginia

By Craig M. Simpson | Go to book overview

Chapter 12 Failed Hope and the Choice of War

When John Brown appeared at Harpers Ferry, Wise was busily embracing the program of the Deep South extremists and searching for ways to close the financial gap between himself and Tide- water Virginia's wealthy aristocrats. Brown did not divert him, but the conscience of a good slaveholder troubled him again. Only an awareness of what he had done and desired in the past allows us to comprehend why he pondered a pardon for Brown and requested one for a young follower of his. If Wise had been younger, he might have gone further.

Wise always believed that few exceeded his commitment to Virginia and the South during the secession crisis and the Civil War. Like many Southerners, he wished to be known as a man of peace who abided by the decision of his people and reluctantly took up arms. There was no ordinary reticence in him, however. He never wanted to argue the case for either secession or war because he thought each unprovable and therefore unwinnable. But if his decisions were thus hard ones, there was little chance of his forsaking the cause of Southern independence altogether, as Senators James H. Hammond of South Carolina and John Bell of Tennessee at least contemplated. 1 Wise's prevarications help to explain, in ways he never acknowledged, both the intensity of his commitment to political revolution and the wavering of his loyalty.

If Wise was not wholly committed to secession, neither did his decision result from his entanglement in the "relentless, horribly logical meshing of gears within" the political mechanism that "dictated an almost certain outcome" during the winter of 1860- 61. 2 To be sure, Wise's maneuverability was diminished as a result of changes in the political structure. But as Barrington Moore, Jr., writes, "The uncertainty of all actors is one of the most significant and neglected aspects of historical crises, great and small." 3 Options remained open and potential outcomes appeared hazardous and unclear until very late. Secession startled and surprised him. It also provided an outlet for the accumulated rage and frustration that had become a part of the political drama. Violence, as it must,

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A Good Southerner: The Life of Henry A. Wise of Virginia
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Illustrations ix
  • Maps x
  • Preface xi
  • Acknowledgments xvii
  • Chapter 1 the Character and Politics of a Young Virginian 3
  • Chapter 2 a Long Farewell to Jackson 16
  • Chapter 3 Defending Shaky Outposts 29
  • Chapter 4 Supporting Tyler and Escaping the Consequences 45
  • Chapter 5 the Good Slaveholder 61
  • Chapter 6 Political Compromise and the Protection of Slavery 78
  • Chapter 7 Political Entitlements 87
  • Chapter 8 Saving Virginia, Preserving the Union 106
  • Chapter 9 a Futile Effort to Revive the Old Dominion 135
  • Chapter 10 Kansas 157
  • Chapter 11 Two Men at Harpers Ferry 203
  • Chapter 12 Failed Hope and the Choice of War 219
  • Chapter 13 Steadfast to the Last 252
  • Chapter 14 Confederate Past, Yankee Future 285
  • Abbreviations 315
  • Notes 319
  • Bibliography 395
  • Index 435
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