The Kaiser's Chemists: Science and Modernization in Imperial Germany

By Jeffrey Allan Johnson | Go to book overview

1 The True Land of Unlimited Possibilities: International Competition, German Modernization, and the Dynamism of Science

We [Germans] do not possess, as do America and Russia, almost all the raw materials that we refine. Germany's greatest riches are undoubtedly the intelligence and industriousness of its population, and with this we must reckon. --Karl Goldschmidt, manufacturer, 1904

Chemistry and with it all natural science is the true land of unlimited possibilities.

-- Emil Fischer, organic chemist, 1911


The Problem

In 1911 Emil Fischer, Germany's leading organic chemist, addressed the inaugural meeting of the Kaiser Wilhelm Society for the Advancement of the Sciences, an organization composed mainly of businessmen who had provided substantial sums for the founding of new research laboratories. In a speech entitled "Recent Successes and Problems of Chemistry," he asserted that "chemistry and with it all natural science is the true land of unlimited possibilities." 1 Fischer backed these words by myriad examples of new scientific perceptions in all fields, but above all of chemical research being translated into practical uses. In particular, Germany could now replace expensive, naturally occurring substances, formerly imported from abroad, with synthetics and artificially produced substitutes based on cheaper, domestically available substances. His speech that day, with the Kaiser himself present in the audience, climaxed more than half a decade of effort directed toward getting the Imperial German government to recognize the economic and political value of chemistry by providing financial support for a new chemical research institution. Fischer's friend Carl Duisberg, one of the directors of the Bayer dye corporation, was "extraordinarily pleased"; at last the "highest authorities" had a "clear

-1-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Kaiser's Chemists: Science and Modernization in Imperial Germany
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 286

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.