Poems in Their Place: The Intertextuality and Order of Poetic Collections

By Neil Fraistat | Go to book overview

NOTES
1.
See William A. Ringler, Jr., ed., The Poems of Sir Philip Sidney ( Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1962), p. 458. Citations of Astrophel and Stella will be made by reference to item and line numbers in this edition.
2.
The Arcadian Rhetorike, ed. Ethel Seaton (Luttrell Society, Oxford: Blackwell, 1950), facsimile of original title page inserted facing p. 1.
3.
Ludovico Ariosto's "Orlando Furioso," trans. Harington, ed. Robert McNulty ( Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1972), p. 183 [comm. on book 16].
4.
It should be remembered that these words "song" and "sonnet" were actually synonymous. Their regular pairing resulted from some persistent urge in English to link two alliterative synonyms, apparently for reinforcement--for example, "might and main," "time and tide," "toss and turn." It was George Gascoigne who in 1575 first attempted to limit the meaning of "sonnet" in English to a poem of fourteen lines: "Some thinke that all Poemes (being short) may be called Sonets, as in deede it is a diminutive worde derived of Sonare, but yet I can beste allowe to call those Sonnets whiche are of fouretene lynes, every line conteyning tenne syllables" ( Certayne Notes of Instruction Concerning the Making of Verse or Ryme in English, in Elizabethan Critical Essays, ed. G. Gregory Smith, 2 vols. [ London: Oxford University Press, 1904], 1:55).
5.
Germaine Warkentin, "The Form of Dante's 'Libello' and Its Challenge to Petrarch,''" Quaderni d'italianistica 2 ( 1981): 162. For helpful comments about the narrative assumptions of Dante and Petrarch, see Sara Sturm-Maddox, "Transformations of Courtly Love Poetry: Vita Nuova and Canzoniere," in The Expansion and Transformations of Courtly Literature, ed. Nathaniel B. Smith and Joseph T. Snow ( Athens: University of Georgia Press, 1980), pp. 128-40.
6.
Sidney could have found a noteworthy precedent for giving the lover a name in George Turbervile Epitaphes, Epigrams, Songs and Sonets ( London, 1567). In this twicereprinted collection of miscellaneous short poems, modeled on Petrarch's rime sparse, Turbervile provides an overarching framework in a passionate but unsuccessful tale of love related in disconnected amorous lyrics, what he calls on the title page "a Discourse of the Friendly affections of Tymetes to Pyndara his Ladie." Turbervile adapts the sonneteer's convention of writing in honor of his own lady by opening and dosing his collection with a poem in fulsome praise of his dedicatee, Lady Anne, Countess of Warwick (incidentally, Sidney's aunt by marriage). In Turbervile's work, however, equally influential as the sonnet tradition was the romantic story of classical lovers, such as Paris and Helen, whom Turbervile uses as the basis for an extended similitude in an introductory poem entitled "The Argument to the whole discourse and Treatise following" (fol. 3-3v: cf. fol. 5v, 60, 117, 122, 138v), and Troilus and Cressida, whom Turbervile recalls repeatedly (cf. fol. 6v, 30v, 32, 49v, 61v, 71-71v, 91, 139-40v). Other hapless couples whom Turbervile mentions include Hero and Leander (fol. 26, 122v), Dido and Aeneas (fol. 63v, 99, 103-104v), and Pyramus and Thisbe (fol. 123v-24). Tymetes and Pyndara belong to this company. And

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Poems in Their Place: The Intertextuality and Order of Poetic Collections
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Acknowledgments vii
  • Introduction the Place of the Book and the Book as Place 3
  • Notes 14
  • Some Issues for Study of Integrated Collections 18
  • Notes 40
  • The Theory and Practice of Poetic Arrangement from Vergil to Ovid 44
  • Notes 63
  • Sequences, Systems, Models Sidney and the Secularization of Sonnets 66
  • Notes 91
  • Jonson, Marvell, and Miscellaneity? 95
  • Notes 115
  • The Arrangement and Order of John Donne's Poems 119
  • Appendix A: Epigrams 150
  • Appendix B: Love Elegies 150
  • Appendix C: Epicedes and Obsequies 153
  • Appendix D: Divine Poems 154
  • Appendix E: Verse Letters 155
  • "Strange Text!" "Paradise Regain'D . . . to Which is Added Samson Agonistes" 164
  • Notes 191
  • "Images Reflect from Art to Art" Alexander Pope's Collected Works of 1717 195
  • Notes 231
  • Multum in Pairvo Wordsworth's Poems, in Two Volumes of 1807 234
  • Notes 251
  • The Book of Byron and the Book of a World 254
  • Notes 271
  • The Arrangement of Browning's Dramatic Lyrics (1842) 273
  • Notes 286
  • Whitman's Leaves and the American "Lyric-Epic" 289
  • Notes 306
  • Marjorie Perloff the Two Ariels the (re)making of the Sylvia Plath Canon 308
  • Notes 331
  • Index 335
  • Notes on the Contributors 343
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