Poems in Their Place: The Intertextuality and Order of Poetic Collections

By Neil Fraistat | Go to book overview

said, "see only as far as the old dispensation allows them to see."53 Jesus, Milton, and Milton's audiences (both contemporary with the poet and now) see further--and beyond. That is finally where such a poetic leads: each poem has its own integrity but also looks beyond itself, while the poems collectively and simultaneously impress themselves upon human consciousness, which they stretch, and press upon human history, which they would salvage.


NOTES

This essay was completed during a research leave provided by the Graduate School of the University of Maryland. All citations of Milton's poetry are given parenthetically within the text and, unless otherwise indicated, are (for the poetry) to The Works of John Milton, ed. Frank Allen Patterson, 18 vols. ( New York: Columbia University Press, 1931-38) and (for the prose) to Complete Prose Works of John Milton, ed. Don M. Wolfe et al., 8 vols. ( New Haven: Yale University Press, and London: Oxford University Press, 1953-83). For Milton's last poems, I have used the standard abbreviations: PL (Paradise Lost), PR (Paradise Regained), SA (Samson Agonistes). The title of my essay derives from Hilaire Belloc Milton ( Philadelphia: J. B. Lippencott, 1935), p. 280.

1.
Balachandra Rajan, "To Which Is Added Samson Agonistes," in The Prison and the Pinnacle: Papers to Commemorate the Tercentenary of "Paradise Regained" and "Samson Agonistes", ed. Balachandra Rajan ( London: Routledge and Kegan Paul, 1973), p. 96. The epigraph for this essay derives from Shawcross piece, "The Genres of Paradise Regain'd and Samson Agonistes: The Wisdom of Their Joint Publication," in Composite Orders: The Genres of Milton's Last Poems, ed. Richard S. Ide and Joseph Wittreich ( Pittsburgh: University of Pittsburgh Press, 1983), p. 240.
2.
See A. S. P. Woodhouse The Heavenly Muse: A Preface to Milton, ed. Hugh MacCallum ( Toronto and Buffalo: University of Toronto Press, 1972), p. 293, and William Riley Parker's Milton: A Biography, 2 vols. ( Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1969), 2:909.
3.
Jonathan Culler, The Pursuit of Signs: Semiotics, Literature, Deconstruction ( 1981; rpt. Ithaca, N.Y.: Cornell University Press, 1983), p. 118.
4.
See Christopher Hill, The Collected Essays of Christopher Hill: Writing and Revolution in Seventeenth-Century England ( Amherst: University of Massachusetts Press, 1985), pp. 32-71, and Annabel Patterson Censorship and Interpretation: The Conditions of Writing and Reading in Early Modern England ( Madison: University of Wisconsin Press, 1984), pp. 44-119.
5.
William A. Oram, "Nature, Poetry, and Milton's Genii," in Milton and the Art of Sacred Song, ed. J. Max Patrick and Roger H. Sundell ( Madison: University of Wisconsin Press, 1979), p. 48. The fullest discussions of these early poetic volumes and of the crucial place of Lycidas in them are provided by Louis L. Martz, Poet of Exile: A Study of Milton's Poetry ( New Haven: Yale University Press, 1980), pp. 31-59; Raymond B.

-191-

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Poems in Their Place: The Intertextuality and Order of Poetic Collections
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Acknowledgments vii
  • Introduction the Place of the Book and the Book as Place 3
  • Notes 14
  • Some Issues for Study of Integrated Collections 18
  • Notes 40
  • The Theory and Practice of Poetic Arrangement from Vergil to Ovid 44
  • Notes 63
  • Sequences, Systems, Models Sidney and the Secularization of Sonnets 66
  • Notes 91
  • Jonson, Marvell, and Miscellaneity? 95
  • Notes 115
  • The Arrangement and Order of John Donne's Poems 119
  • Appendix A: Epigrams 150
  • Appendix B: Love Elegies 150
  • Appendix C: Epicedes and Obsequies 153
  • Appendix D: Divine Poems 154
  • Appendix E: Verse Letters 155
  • "Strange Text!" "Paradise Regain'D . . . to Which is Added Samson Agonistes" 164
  • Notes 191
  • "Images Reflect from Art to Art" Alexander Pope's Collected Works of 1717 195
  • Notes 231
  • Multum in Pairvo Wordsworth's Poems, in Two Volumes of 1807 234
  • Notes 251
  • The Book of Byron and the Book of a World 254
  • Notes 271
  • The Arrangement of Browning's Dramatic Lyrics (1842) 273
  • Notes 286
  • Whitman's Leaves and the American "Lyric-Epic" 289
  • Notes 306
  • Marjorie Perloff the Two Ariels the (re)making of the Sylvia Plath Canon 308
  • Notes 331
  • Index 335
  • Notes on the Contributors 343
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