Western Enterprise in Far Eastern Economic Development: China and Japan

By G. C. Allen; Audrey G. Donnithorne | Go to book overview

CHAPTER IV THE ORGANISATION OF THE EXPORT TRADE: MISCELLANEOUS GOODS

1. VEGETABLE OIL AND OIL PRODUCTS

THE exports of vegetable oil and of other products of seeds and nuts did not become substantial until the early years of the twentieth century, although the origins of the trade can be traced back for many decades. The products fell into two main groups, first, edible oils such as bean, groundnut, cotton-seed and sesamum oils, together with their byproducts, and, second, wood oil used in the manufacture of paint and varnish. In the world as a whole fats were becoming scarce at the beginning of the present century because of the fall in the supplies of whale oil and the rise in consumption in Europe and America. The foreign merchants in China, who constituted the link between the resources of that country and the demands of the outside world, were able to tap those resources and eventually to build up a large business. The decline in the older staple exports, tea and silk, was thus partly offset by the expansion of this new trade.

The development of vegetable oil exports did not depend solely upon the commercial contacts with the West, nor even upon the capacity of Western firms to introduce modern methods of expressing the oil. It required the simultaneous infusion of new techniques into several different branches of China's economy, especially into transport. Thus, new methods of storage and carriage by sea had to be introduced, and scientific methods ensuring the purity of the product (e.g. examination by spectroscope) had to be adapted to this purpose. Some of the chief sources of the supply of the materials, moreover, were made accessible only by the activities of Western shipping in Chinese waters and by the construction of railways in China itself. Indeed, in some branches of the trade, the original function performed by the Westerners was the provision of efficient transport for oil and oil products between different parts of the country. Foreign enterprise thus started by helping to expand an internal trade, and then, when overseas market conditions became favourable, it was well placed for taking advantage of them. The foreigners were confronted with many of the problems that they met with in other branches of Chinese trade. As with other products in a period of growing demand, adulteration was common and the difficulty

-69-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Western Enterprise in Far Eastern Economic Development: China and Japan
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 294

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.