Western Enterprise in Far Eastern Economic Development: China and Japan

By G. C. Allen; Audrey G. Donnithorne | Go to book overview

CHAPTER XIV MANUFACTURING INDUSTRY AND CAPITAL INVESTMENT

1. Manufacturing Industry

In merchanting, shipping and the financing of foreign trade the Westerners performed functions essential to the growth of the Japanese economy. Until the end of the nineteenth century they retained preeminence in those spheres, and it was not until after the First World War that their rôle became a subordinate one. In manufacturing industry, however, the history of Western enterprise was quite different. Although in the decades that immediately followed the opening of the country, Western advisers and experts had an important influence on the country's industrial evolution, and although the commercial intercourse which the foreign merchants made possible had profound indirect effects on industrial production, instances of Western industrial enterprise as such were very few. Indeed, direct participation by Western firms in Japan's industrial expansion, though always limited to a small number of industries, was considerably more important in the twentieth century, especially after the First World War, than at any time during the nineteenth century. It might have been thought that Western industrial entrepreneurship would have found ample scope in a country where the Government was deliberately fostering industrialisation, but where the business classes had at first but small acquaintance with modern methods of organisation. That this was not so needs explanation.

The legal restrictions on the foreigners' rights of acquiring land and of residing in the interior cannot be regarded as a major cause of their failure to set up manufacturing industry during the later decades of the nineteenth century; for they had extra-territorial privileges and special rights in the 'open ports', and they could in any case have operated through Japanese agents. The chief reasons are probably to be found in the attitude of the Japanese Government towards the economic activities of foreigners and in the economic prospects of Japan as these were viewed by the early Western residents. The Japanese were fearful lest their country should be reduced to a colonial status, and for this reason, while they were intent upon introducing modern industrialism, they were equally determined that the control of such undertakings should rest in Japanese hands. The Government, therefore, as already shown, took the lead in founding new manufactures and later gave

-223-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Western Enterprise in Far Eastern Economic Development: China and Japan
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 294

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.