In the Land of the Grasshopper Song: Two Women in the Klamath River Indian Country in 1908-09

By Mary Ellicott Arnold; Mabel Reed | Go to book overview

CHAPTER III We Cross the River into Indian Country

We slept well the first night in the Indian rancheria of Kot-e-meen. We made up a bed of sorts on the floor, and we put a little billet of wood under our window to hold it up about three inches from the bottom. Personally I did not want to open the window any more than three inches because I had an uncomfortable feeling that a panther might push his way in. No one had told us any stories of panthers that came in through half-opened windows but then they do not tell you all they know in this country.

We find that we have moved into a very, very large house, according to Indian standards, and that it was built for a white man. It has a large room all across the front and space back of this room that can be used as a kitchen. Then there is a loft upstairs where you can stand upright in the middle of the floor. The ten-dollars-a-month rent we pay for the house apparently includes a chair, a stool and a frying pan. Mabel is especially pleased by the discovery of the frying pan.

Quite a little distance behind the house is a little grove of pepper trees, and hidden among the pepper trees is a delightful little spring. And, added to everything else, we are very much set up to find that we have a privy. From what we hear, it is the only privy between Somesbar and Happy Camp, a distance of sixty miles. We found it lurking in an unexpected place in front of the house. It discreetly turns its back on the Hamill cabin, concealing the fact that it has no door.

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