In the Land of the Grasshopper Song: Two Women in the Klamath River Indian Country in 1908-09

By Mary Ellicott Arnold; Mabel Reed | Go to book overview

CHAPTER XX
The Schoolmarms Come Down Like Wolves on Yreka, and Then Celebrate the Fourth in Indian Country

We have just learned that one of our neighbors near Ossi- puk is in trouble. He is an Indian called Mark-faced Steve. Last winter, he built a bridge for the county. Now the county refuses to pay him for the bridge and we cannot make out what is the reason or what went wrong. Steve owes money to Luther Hickox, and Luther says he wants his money and that Steve has got to pay it. Mark-faced Steve rightly feels that it is not wise to be on bad terms with Luther and has come to us about it. Several weeks ago, we wrote the county but have had no reply.

"You fellows better go to Yreka," Luther called out to us as we rode by. Luther was in high spirits. He had been mining all day, he said, and he expected to strike a core of metal any moment.

"I wouldn't take twenty thousand dollars for that mine" he called after us.

"We could go to Yreka," said Mabel later, as we sat on the porch at I-ees-i-rum. "If we went by way of Happy Camp and Hamburg, we wouldn't have to ford the Klamath with the mules."

Our Karok country extends from Happy Camp to Witchpec. Steve says that when the Great Spirit came down the Klamath, wherever he camped for the night he changed the language. The Great Spirit certainly made better going of it than we do, for after he had changed the language at Happy Camp he made over a hundred miles in the next

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