The Constitutional Documents of the Puritan Revolution 1625-1660

By Samuel Rawson Gardiner | Go to book overview

goods and estate as no tax, tallage, &c., nor any soldier can be billeted in his house, &c.

Be it enacted that no tax, tallage, or loan shall be levied &c., by the King or any minister by Act, of Parliament, and that none be compelled to receive any soldiers into his house against his will.


10. THE PETITION OF RIGHT.

[ June 7, 1628. 3 Car. I, cap. 1. Statutes of the Realm, v. 23. See Hist. of Engl. vi. 274-309.]

The Petition exhibited to His Majesty by the Lords spiritual and Temporal, and Commons in this present Parliament assembled, concerning divers Majesty's and Liberties of the Subjects, with the King's Majesty's Royal Answer thereunto in full Parliament.


To the King's Most Excellent Majesty.

Humbly show unto our Sovereign Lord the King, the Lords Spiritual and Temporal, and Commons in Parliament assembled, that whereas it is declared and enacted by a statute made in the time of the reign of King Edward the First, commonly called Statutum de Tallagio won concedendo1, that no tallage or aid shall be laid or levied by the King or his heirs in this realm, without the goodwill and assent of the Archbishops, Bishops, Earls, Barons, Knights, Burgesses, and other the freemen of the commonalty of this realm: and by authority of Parliament holden in the five and twentieth year of the reign of King Edward the Third2, it is declared and enacted, that from thenceforth no person shall be compelled to make any loans to the King against his will, because such loans were against reason and the franchise of the land; and by other laws of this realm it is provided, that none should be charged by any charge or imposition, called a Benevolence, or by such like charge 3, by which the statutes before-mentioned, and other the good laws and statutes of this realm, your subjects have

____________________
1
This is now held not to have been a statute. See Stubbs, Const. Hist. (ed. 1875), ii. 143, Select Charters, p. 87.
2
I have failed to discover this statute.
3
In 1484, 1 Ric. III. c. 2.

-66-

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