The Constitutional Documents of the Puritan Revolution 1625-1660

By Samuel Rawson Gardiner | Go to book overview
authority. 11. The censures, recantations, punishments, and submissions, made, enjoined, and inflicted upon those that taught contrary thereunto, as Barrow and Barrett in Cambridge, and Bridges in Oxford.The remedy of which abuses we conceive may be these: 1. Due execution of lawrs against Papists. 2. Exemplary punishments to be inflicted upon teachers, publishers, and maintainers of Popish opinions, and prictising of' superstitious ceremonies, and some stricter laws in that case to be provided. 3. The orthodox doctrine of our Church, in these now controverted points by the Arminian sect, may be established and freely taught; according as it hath been hitherto generally received, without any alteration or innovation; and severe punishment, by the same laws to be provided against such as shall, either by word or writing, publish anything contrary thereunto. 4. That the said books of Bishop Montgue and Cosin may be burned. 5. That such as have been authors, or abettors, of those Popish and Arminian innovations in doctrine, may be condignly punished. 6. That some good order may be taken for licensing books hereafter. 7. That His Majesty would be graciously pleased to confer bishoprics, and other ecclesiasticial preferments, with advice of his Privy Council, upon learned, pious, and orthodox men. 8. That, bishops and clergymen being well chosen, may reside upon their charge, and with diligence and fidelity perform their several duties, and. that accordingly they may be cointenanced and preferred. 9. That some course may, in this Parliament, be considered of, for providing competent means to maintain a godly, able minister in every parish church of' this kingdom. 10. That His Majesty would be graciously pleased to make a special choice of such persons, for the execution of his ecclesiastical commissions, as are approved for integrity of life and soundness of doctrine.
15. PROTESTATION OF THE HOUSE OF COMMONS.
[ March 2, 1628-9. Rushworth, i. 660. See Hist. of Engl. vii. 75.]
Whosoever shall bring in innovation of religion, or by favour or countenance seek to extend or introduce Popery

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