The Constitutional Documents of the Puritan Revolution 1625-1660

By Samuel Rawson Gardiner | Go to book overview
2. That they have traitorously endeavoured, by many foul aspersions upon His Majesty and his government, to alienate the affections of his people, and to make His Majesty odious unto them.
3. That they have endeavoured to draw His Majesty's late army to disobedience to His Majesty's commands, and to side with them in their traitorous designs.
4. That they have traitorously invited and encouraged a foreign power to invade His Majesty's kingdom of England.
5. That they have traitorously endeavoured to subvert the rights and the very being of Parliaments.
6. That for the completing of their traitorous designs they have endeavoured (as far as in them lay) by force and terror to compel the Parliament to join with them in their traitorous designs, and to that end have actually raised and countenanced tumults against the King and Parliament.
7. And that they have traitorously conspired to levy, and actually have levied, war against the King.

47. A DECLARATION OF THE HOUSE OF COMMONS TOUCHING A LATE BREACH OF THEIR PRIVILEGES.

[ January 17, 164 1/2. Rushworth, iv. 484. See Journals of the House of Commons, ii. 373, 383.]

Whereas the chambers, studies and trunks of Mr. Denzil Holles, Sir Arthur Haslerigg, Mr John Pym, Mr. John Hampden and Mr. William Strode, Esquires, members of the House of Commons, upon Monday the third of this instant January, by colour of His Majesty's warrant, have been sealed up by Sir William Killigrew and Sir William Fleming and others, which is not only against the privilege of Parliament, but the common liberty of every subject; which said members afterwards the same day were under the like colour, by Serjeant Francis, one of His Majesty's serjeants-at-arms, contrary to all former precedents, demanded of the Speaker, sitting in the House of Commons, to be delivered unto him, that he might arrest them of high treason; and whereas afterwards, the next day His Majesty in his royal person came to the said House, attended

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