The Constitutional Documents of the Puritan Revolution 1625-1660

By Samuel Rawson Gardiner | Go to book overview
privilege of Parliament, a great scandal to His Majesty and his government, a seditious act manifestly tending to the subversion of the peace of the kingdom, and an injury and dishonour to the said members, there being no legal charge or accusation against them.That the privileges of Parliament and the liberties of the subjects so violated and broken, cannot be fully and sufficiently vindicated unless His Majesty will be graciously pleased to discover the names of those persons who advised His Majesty to issue out warrants for the sealing of the chambers and studies of the said members, to send a serjeant-at-arms to demand the said members, to issue out several warrants under His Majesty's own hand to apprehend the said members, His Majesty's coming thither in his own royal person, the publishing of the said articles and printed paper, in the form of a Proclamation, against the said members in such manner as is before declared, to the end that such persons may receive condign punishment.And this House doth further declare, that all such persons as have given any counsel, or endeavoured to set or maintain division or dislike between the King and Parliament, or have listed their names or otherwise entered into any combination or agreement to the aiding or assisting to any such counsel or endeavour, or have persuaded any other so to do, or that shall do any the things above mentioned; and that shall not forth- with discover the same to either House of Parliament, or the Speaker of either of the said Houses respectively, and disclaim. it, are declared public enemies of the State and peace of this kingdom, and shall be enquired of and proceeded against accordingly.
48. THE CLERICAL DISABILITIES ACT.
[ February 13, 164 1/2. 17 Car. I, cap. 27. Statutes of the Realm, v. 138. See Hist. of Engl. x. 165.]

An Act for disenabling all persons in Holy Orders to exercise any temporal jurisdiction or authority.

1. Whereas Bishops and other persons in Holy Orders ought not to be entangled with secular jurisdiction, the office

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