The Constitutional Documents of the Puritan Revolution 1625-1660

By Samuel Rawson Gardiner | Go to book overview
with themselves, and to lay a foundation of further confidence between your Highness and them, to the rejoicing of the hearts of our friends and terror of our enemies.

Which Petition being presented the 25th day of May, 1657, his Highness' answer thereunto was read by the Clerk of the Parliament in these words,

The Lord Protector doth consent.


103. THE ADDITIONAL PETITION AND ADVICE.

[ June 26, 1657. Scobell, ii. 450. See Masson Life of Milton, v.142.]

To his Highness the Lord Protector of the Commonwealth of England, Scotland and Ireland, and the dominions and territories thereunto belonging; the humble additional and explanatory Petition and Advice of the knights, citizens and burgesses now assembled in the Parliament of this Commonwealth.

Whereas upon the humble Petition and Advice of the said knights, citizens and burgesses, now assembled in the Parliament of this Commonwealth, lately presented and consented unto by your Highness, certain doubts and questions have arisen, concerning some particulars therein comprised, for explanation whereof my it please your Highness to declare and consent unto the additions and explanations hereafter mentioned, and may it be declared with your Highness' consent:


In the fourth Article.

That such person and persons as invaded England, under Duke Hamilton, in the year 1648, or advised, consented, assisted or voluntarily contributed unto that war, and were for that cause debarred from public trust by the Parliament of Scotland, be incapable to elect or be elected to sit and serve as members of Parliament, or in any other place of public trust, relating unto the fourth and thirteenth Articles in the Petition and Advice, excepting such as since have borne arms for your Highness or the Parliament, or have been admitted to sit and serve in the Parliament of this Commonwealth, and are of good life and conversation, or such as shall hereafter

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