Ralph Waldo Emerson

By George Edward Woodberry | Go to book overview

NOTE

THE main sources for Emerson's biography are James Elliot Cabot's Memoir and E. W. Emerson Emerson in Concord. These, together with Emerson's works, afford the basis of the present volume, and for the use which has been made of them the author takes pleasure in thanking the publishers, Messrs. Houghton, Mifflin, and Co., who kindly granted the necessary permission. Other illustrations of Emerson's character and career are found scattered in the reminiscences of his contemporaries, particularly in the volumes by Conway, Ireland, Albee, Alcott, Haskins, Sanborn, and Holmes; but these writers add little except detail. Two other small books deserve mention for their excellent rendering of Emerson's personality in old age,-- J. B. Thayer A Western Journey with Mr. Emerson, and C. J. Woodbury Talks with Ralph Waldo Emerson. The Correspondence of Emerson with Carlyle and his Letters to a Friend, both edited by C. E. Norton, and other letters to Hermann Grimm and to a classmate, published respectively in the Atlantic Monthly, May, 1903, and the Century, July, 1883, complete the list of sources.

G. E. WOODBERRY.

BEVERLY, MASSACHUSETTS, November 11, 1906.

-v-

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Ralph Waldo Emerson
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Note v
  • Contents vii
  • Chapter I - The Voice Obeyed at Prime 1
  • Chapter II - "Nature" and Its Corollaries 44
  • Chapter III - "The Hypocritic Days" 64
  • Chapter IV - The Essays 107
  • Chapter V - The Poems 158
  • Chapter VI - Terminus 178
  • Index 199
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