Hamilton Fish: The Inner History of the Grant Administration - Vol. 1

By Allan Nevins | Go to book overview

PREFACE

IN presenting so full a reconstruction of American history 1869-1877 as is embodied in this volume, I feel that a special word of explanation is required. The completeness of this revision of history, the wealth of new lights upon men and events, was made possible by the scope and rich- ness of Hamilton Fish's papers. In particular, all readers interested in this sordid and troubled period owe a debt of gratitude to Hamilton Fish for his elaborate diary. Amid the cares of office he somehow found time to leave a record more voluminous than that of Gideon Welles or James K. Polk, only less imposing than that of John Quincy Adams. Covering eight crowded years, it is a record of somewhat curious quality. It is detached, objective, unemotional; except at rare intervals it avoids the expression of personal feeling or confidential opinion; it is in general a bare summary of what was said and done in Fish's presence. Diplomatic affairs are for the most part kept in the foreground, political affairs in the background. The objectivity of style may at first irritate the reader. But historically, it perhaps increases rather than decreases the value of the record. Here is none of the prejudice to be found in Welles, none of the ill-governed and waspish emotion so frequent in Adams' Memoirs. It is an honest chronicle of day to day events, written without the slightest subsequent editing by a calm and honest man.

In doing history a service by keeping a diary and preserving an enormous mass of correspondence, Hamilton Fish also did himself a service. He has hitherto been the most obscure of the really eminent American leaders of the nineteenth century. The reason is that little has thus far been known of his acts, motives, and accomplishments. For reasons not here necessary to state, the preparation of a biography of this commanding figure was repeatedly delayed. It is now almost sixty years since he retired from office, almost forty-five since his death. Yet this volume constitutes the first real effort to treat the achievements of one of our ablest Secretaries of State, of by far the strongest member of the Grant Administration--the leader who, as these pages show, saved that Administration from total disgrace. Because of the lack of a biography, this true statesman has remained but a nominis umbra while mere politicians of the period have impressed the public imagination. Ordi-

-vii-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Hamilton Fish: The Inner History of the Grant Administration - Vol. 1
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Preface vii
  • Introduction xi
  • Contents xix
  • Chapter I- An Heir of the Federalists 1
  • Chapter II- The Great Whig Battles 20
  • Chapter III- The Senate in Stormy Days 36
  • Chapter IV- Travel and War 66
  • Chapter V- The Watcher 89
  • Chapter VI- Grant in Power 105
  • Chapter VII- Portrait of a President 124
  • Chapter VIII- Broadside from Sumner 142
  • Chapter IX 176
  • Chapter X- Motley''s Insubordination 201
  • Chapter XII- Pandora''s Box 249
  • Chapter XIII- Congress in Session 279
  • Chapter XIV- The Battle of Santo Domingo 309
  • Chapter XV- Crisis- June, 1870 335
  • Chapter XVI- Exit Motley--And Sumner''s Policy 372
  • Chapter XVII- War in Europe 400
  • Chapter XVIII- The Road to Peace 423
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 450

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.