The Man Who Rode the Tiger: The Life and Times of Judge Samuel Seabury

By Herbert Mitgang | Go to book overview

CHAPTER 10
The Magistrates' Courts Investigation

EACH morning at 8:25, Nick Livingston, at the wheel of the dark green Lincoln with SS-19 on the license plates, pulled up in front of the six-story mansion on East 63rd Street. Seabury asked him to be there promptly at 8:30. But ever since the Judge had begun to drive to the state building at 80 Centre Street instead of to the private law office at 120 Broadway, his eagerness to get going made him step out the front door five minutes early. There seemed to be a new spring in his stride as he walked toward the limousine. Once inside, he settled back, lit his pipe, and read a newspaper (turning first to accounts of the investigation) during the brief ride downtown.

Seabury was the fulcrum about which his assistants turned. He devoted his energies equally to planning strategy with Kresel and to following the progress of the investigative attorneys. At the outset of the magistrates investigation, he had abandoned his own practice. Trosk remained at 120 Broadway for a while to finish up the private cases, but he, too, soon gave most of his time to preparing the reports at so Centre Street. Dorothy Benner found herself reporting directly to the Judge at the state building; he would not trust a strange secretary with the confidential information culled from the private hearings. Someone had to handle the affairs at the law office, however, and the thankless job was given to Bernie Richland, who spent

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