INTRODUCTION
THE RELIEF OF BELGIUM AND NORTHERN FRANCE

Germany declared war on France on August 3, 1914. Their armies of 2,000,000 men smashed into Belgium in violation of their treaties guaranteeing its neutrality. By heroic sacrifice, the Belgian army of 117,000 men delayed the German march for some days, and this delay enabled the French and British time to re-form and rally on the Marne.

However, the Belgians, under the command of King Albert, managed to hold a scrap of their homeland throughout the war. They clung to the locks at Nieuport and, by this control, flooded the inland for about twenty miles of Belgian front. Although 80 per cent of their original army had been destroyed, the King and his newly recruited men held this scrap of their country for the whole war.

The Allied counterattack on the Marne drove the Germans back to a line about four hundred miles long, stretching from the Belgian front to the Swiss frontier. Here the armies remained fixed behind barbed wire and in trenches for nearly four years, until October, 1918. Except for this little fragment, all Belgium, with about 7,500,000 people, was occupied by the Germans. They also held, behind their lines under German hobnailed boots, about 2,500,000 French or a total of about 10,000,000 people.

Belgium and Northern France were highly industrialized areas and were dependent on imports for 70 per cent of their food, practically all of their textiles and clothing, and most of their leather and other industrial raw materials.

-xxi-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
An American Epic - Vol. 1
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 480

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.