CHAPTER 19
THE BRITISH REFUSE US MORE FOOD THROUGH THE BLOCKADE

A much greater problem confronted us in Belgium than the petty transactions related in the preceding chapter. By December, 1915, it was evident that with the seasonal exhaustion of native supplies, we would have to import much more food into Belgium if we were to maintain an average ration of about 1,800 calories per diem per person, which, even so, was only about 60 per cent of normal for either themselves or the British. Therefore, on December 21, 1, asked the British for an increase in blockade permits from the then total of 80,000 tons a month to the following tonnage per month:

Wheat (or flour) 54,000
Lard 7,000
Bacon 3,500
Rice 5,000
Condensed milk 1,000
Beans and peas 4,000
Maize 20,000
Sugar 2,000
Coffee 2,000
Soap 1,000
Potatoes 10,000
salad oils 400
Preserved meats 1,500
Preserved fish 400
Cocoa 1,000
Oleomargarine materials 1,000
Butter 500
Dried fruit 100
Linseed cake 10,000
Cheese 2,000
Total 126,400

-179-

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