CHAPTER 35
I GET PASSAGE TO EUROPE WITH ADVENTURES

It was urgent that I get back to Europe, and since all North Atlantic passenger traffic had been suspended, I finally secured passage for Cadiz on an ancient Spanish cargo jalopy with some passenger accommodations, the Antonio López. I was accompanied by Will Irwin of the Saturday Evening Post staff. We sailed on March 13, 1917, and after roaming around the Atlantic for twelve days, we arrived at Cadiz on March 25. Fortunately, the ship carried a radio operator, and our offices kept me advised on important matters. Since I could not deal with these questions effectively until I reached London, I defer discussing them at this point.

By the ship's wireless we received news of the U-boat sinking of several American vessels and of the revolution in Russia. We were of the opinion that this would remove one objection to the United States' joining the Allies by removing the fear that the war was a fight to sustain the Czar. It seemed certain that the United States would soon be in the war and that we would need to substitute other neutrals for our staff in Belgium and the North of France.

I have given an account in my Memoirs of the experiences which I encountered from Cadiz to London, and with slight revisions I reproduce it here because of its link with C.R.B. affairs.

At Cadiz I was met by an official who asked me to stop at Madrid to confer with the Spanish Minister of Foreign Affairs. Our landing being on Sunday, we made a thorough examination of Cadiz, although I was in

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