CHAPTER 55
EXPRESSIONS OF APPRECIATION TO THE C.R.B.

FROM THE FRENCH

Already included in Chapters 19 and 34 are statements of appreciation from President Poincaré, and Foreign Minister Briand. M. Edmond Labbé, who had been the real leader of our French Comité du Nord during the entire life of the Commission, wrote Poland:

LILLE, 24 December 1919

DEAR SIR:

. . . You know, as well as Mr. Hoover, what gratitude your concerted labors have awakened in our hearts. Let us express it once more, fully conscious of the service that the C.R.B. rendered to our populations during the interminable duration of this horrible war. The C.R.B. has given us the means of resisting physiological deterioration, and, what is of even greater value, of fighting against the weakening of our morale.

This task once accomplished, the Committee might have considered its work completed. . . . [The work continued] for the young and adolescent who had been so hindered in their development by insufficient food, and for the . . . mothers . . . to prepare the way for robuster generations. . . .

For four years, in spite of our anguish, in spite of our fears, in spite of our mourning and misery, the C.R.B. furnished us with the means of making every Christmas a little less somber, of giving back to every family a little joy for this festival, and reminding them, for at least one day in the year, that they should keep their faith in the future and yet hope for a happy issue. How could we lose such memories? . . .

We send it [the Commission] the expression of our gratitude, to all

-441-

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