APPENDIX
THE AMERICAN STAFF OF THE C.R.B.

There is no eloquence that can portray the loyalty and devotion of the American staff of the C.R.B. Theirs was a service at the command of pure idealism. They were men who sacrificed their positions and came to the service of saving the lives of ten million men, women, and children.

The men and women on the following list received no remuneration. Only to some of the youngsters did we allow traveling expenses. Many gave service during the whole four years, the others for varied periods, but always a sacrifice to human service.

Theirs was a task of difficulties by day and lasted far into the nights. They seldom lived as they were accustomed at home. Winter storms and contagious diseases were but minor discomforts. Their abilities and tact in preserving the lives of ten million, amid the conflicts of a great war, are proved by their successes. The only tribute a historian can offer them is to preserve their names and terms of service in this volume. To each of them, I owe a debt of gratitude for their friendship, which has extended all of their lives.1

The list below is the volunteer staff. They carried all the major responsibilities. We employed large paid clerical and accounting staffs, and they were no less devoted to the Commission and its purpose than the volunteer staff.

____________________
1
The list below is not complete, since in the hurry of war we kept no formal register. The term "withdrawal" refers to the removal of our staff in Belgium and Northern France at the United States' declaration of war in April, 1917. As the text shows, some of them were retained longer in their tasks by agreement with the Germans.

-455-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
An American Epic - Vol. 1
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 480

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.