Civilities and Civil Rights: Greensboro, North Carolina, and the Black Struggle for Freedom

By William H. Chafe | Go to book overview

Notes

For reasons of economy and space, these notes have been abridged for the paperback edition of Civilities and Civil Rights. What follows are summaries of the most important sources used in each chapter. More complete documentation can be found in the hardback edition of Civilities and Civil Rights.


Introduction
1.
Perhaps the best studies of the civil rights revolution have come from participants and journalists. See, e.g., Debbie Lewis, And We Are Not Saved ( New York, 1970); Cleveland Sellers, River of No Return ( New York, 1975); Anne Moody, Coming of Age in Mississippi ( New York, 1968); James Forman, The Making of a Black Revolutionary ( New York, 1975); and Pat Watters and Reese Cleghorn, Climbing Jacob's Ladder: The Arrival of Negroes in Southern Politics ( New York, 1967). One of the best histories of civil rights organizations is August Meier and Elliott Rudwick, CORE: A Study in the Civil Rights Movement, 1942-1968 ( New York, 1973). Other books on the civil rights movement include Louis Lomax, The Negro Revolt ( New York, 1962); David Lewis , King: A Critical Biography ( New York, 1970); and Howard Zinn, SNCC: The New Abolitionists ( Boston, 1964), to name just a few. Carl Brauer, John F. Kennedy and the Second Reconstruction ( New York, 1977), is one of those who argues the importance of presidential initiatives. Among public- opinion surveys of racial attitudes are the following: Samuel Lubell, White and Black: Test of a Nation ( New York, 1964); and Richard Lemon, The Troubled Americans ( New York, 1970); and Angus Campbell, White Attitudes Toward Black People ( Ann Arbor, 1971).

Books on the South, and on southern personalities, include the following: V. O. Key , Southern Politics ( New York, 1950); William C. Harvard (ed.), The Changing Politics of the South ( Baton Rouge, 1972); Jack Bass and Walter

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Civilities and Civil Rights: Greensboro, North Carolina, and the Black Struggle for Freedom
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Preface vii
  • Acknowledgments ix
  • Contents xiii
  • Introduction 3
  • Part I Years of Protest 11
  • Chapter One - Inch by Inch----- 13
  • Chapter Two - the Politics of Moderation 42
  • Chapter Three - the Sit-Ins Begin 71
  • Chapter Four - a Time of Testing 102
  • Chapter Five - "My Feet Took Wings" 119
  • Part II Years of Polarization 153
  • Chapter Six - "We Will Stand Pat" 155
  • Chapter Seven - Black Power 172
  • Chapter Eight the End or the Beginning 203
  • Chapter Nine Struggle and Ambiguity 237
  • Epilogue for the Paperback Edition 251
  • Notes 255
  • A Note on Sources 269
  • Index 275
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